Featured Articles

  • Football has another record setting game

    By GRACE MISEROCCHI

    The football team beat the Virginia Military Institute Keydets 63-21 Saturday afternoon in their first conference matchup of the season.

    This is the highest the Bulldogs have scored in a conference game and the first time since 1987 they have had two 50-plus point games back-to-back.

    “There were some good plays all the way around. It was not just one guy; it was a group. Good football game and team win,” assistant coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

    In the first half, Samford scored a school record of 28 points against a Southern Conference team. Junior quarterback Michael Eubank set a record by rushing 11 times for 4 touchdowns and completed 6 out of 9 passes for one touchdown.

    “The game plan came together and everything just went as the coaches said it would. They prepared us very well. The blocking up front was extraordinary today,” Eubank, a communications studies major, said.

    Junior defensive back Josh Kimberlin made two key interceptions in the first half.

    Web Condensed Version“My ultimate goal is to help the team, whatever it looks like, I am going to do my part,” Kimberlin, a sports administration major, said.

    Sophomore running back and undecided major Denzel Williams rushed 16 times for a career-high 178 yards. This is his third game in this position.

    “Things are flowing a lot better than last week. This position feels like home now,” Williams said.

    In the second half, freshman running back and undecided major Krondis Larry scored his first collegiate touchdown. Backup quarterback and redshirt junior Carson Bennett played most of the second half and had 6 attempts for 26 yards.

    The Keydet’s quarterback, Al Cobb, completed 18 out of 25 passes for 117 yards. Running back Jabari Turner rushed 15 times for two touchdowns.

    Samford will play the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs next Saturday. Chattanooga is 1-2 and coming off a loss to Austin Peay.

    “The Southern Conference every week is a battle. There are a lot of good football teams and Chattanooga is certainly a good team. We are going to get ourselves ready to play against an excellent football team,” D’Ottavio said.

    Eubank says that they will enter the Chattanooga game with a similar mindset that they had this week, which is to do everything they need to do to keep the ball in their possession.

    The Bulldogs will play in Chattanooga Saturday, Sept. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UTC’s Finley Stadium.

    | September 21, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Faculty Senate to vote on intellectual property policy

    by EMILY FEATHERSTON, News Editor

    The faculty senate will vote Monday on a significant revision of Samford’s intellectual property policy.

    The proposed policy, provided to the Crimson by business affairs and faculty welfare committee chairman Jennings Marshall, addresses Samford’s use of faculty and student work created at the university or using university resources It also covers ownership of patents for discoveries made by faculty, students or staff.

    “We felt it was appropriate and timely to update our intellectual property policy to fit current times,” said Vice President for Business and Financial Affairs Harry B. Brock, III.

    Brock said the intellectual property policy has not been updated since the 1990s, and the university felt new language was needed to keep up with changes in technology and teaching methods, as well as the increase in research at Samford.

    For students, the policy primarily addresses the university’s rights to use, display, distribute or perform any creative or scholarly work created to satisfy a university course credit. The policy would give the university a “nonexclusive, royalty-free license” to use student works for educational purposes.

    “It’s only two sentences, but it’s pretty comprehensive,” chemistry professor and values council member Brian Gregory said.

    For faculty, the policy would give the university irrevocable, royalty-free license to use works created for use in university-sponsored courses. This use includes in-classroom use and distribution; use in online programs; educational, promotional or administrative purposes; and to preserve or archive the work. While the policy allows rights to the underlying content to remain the property of the creating professor, the method and manner used to distribute that content belong to the university.

    Under the policy, any discovery made during research done on or associated with the university that leads to a patentable invention would also belong to the university. Any revenue resulting from the patent would be divided between the creator and Samford.

    The policy also covers “institutional works” produced by both students and faculty for “specific university purposes.” These works include university and student publications such as Seasons and Entre Nous. Under the proposed policy, the university would claim ownership of these publications and works.

    “We feel it is a fair and reasonable policy for both the university and faculty and students,” said Brock.

    However, several professors have expressed concern with the language of the policy as well as the implications.

    Gregory said he feared the changes infringe on students’ rights and open a channel for legal litigation against the university. He said his concerns lie with the use of materials used to determine a student’s grade, such as a research paper, and if this use would be in violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

    “If grades are protected by FERPA, the method of determining that grade should be protected,” Gregory said.

    Brock said, however, that students would be able to submit a formal request to the university that a specific work not be used, though the process of that submission is not detailed in the policy.

    “The intent is not to use anything ‘unflattering’ to the originator,” Brock said.

    Other professors are concerned that the policy changes will hinder student and faculty creativity, and create an atmosphere of distrust.

    “Overall, the policy has the potential to change the climate of the institution,” communication studies professor Charlotte Brammer said.

    Both Gregory and Brammer are also concerned that the policy would violate 17 U.S.C § 106, the fair-use guidelines of U.S. copyright law.

    “Fair use is clearly defined for works in the public domain, but it’s tenuous at best for this,” Gregory said.

    Brock said, however, that the policy stresses “use” in terms of educational purposes and to “show off” the good work created by students and faculty.

    “We’re not looking to create conflict, but simply to preserve a privilege to use in an appropriate fashion,” Brock said.

    The policy will go before the faculty senate tomorrow at their first official meeting of the 2014 fall semester. It was read for the first time at the April meeting after being approved by the business affairs and faculty welfare committee. Jennings said the policy was introduced by Brock and Assistant Vice President for Business and Financial Affairs and General Counsel Lisa C. Imbragulio.

    After committee members expressed concerns, Jennings said Brock and Imbragulio allowed the committee to nearly rewrite the policy. Jennings said that the revisions were met with support, except from faculty from the McWhorter School of Pharmacy who showed continued concern for the patent policy.

    Jennings also claimed that Robert’s Rules of Order, or the official operating procedures for legislative bodies, were violated when amendments to the policy were made after it left committee.

    Senate chair and pharmacy professor Erika Cretton-Scott declined to comment on the policy to maintain impartiality before Monday’s meeting.

    If the faculty senate approves the policy, it will then go before the entire faculty to be approved at large. After that, it will be have to be approved by the board of trustees.

    | September 21, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Football defeats Stillman

    DSC_0231By GRACE MISEROCCHI – Sports Editor

    The football team defeated the Stillman College tigers 52-0 on Thursday night in its first shutout since 2009.

    Samford completed 492 total offensive yards this game. Head Coach Pat Sullivan coached the game from the press box after missing the season opener at TCU because of surgery.

    “The guys played well tonight. There were some good things. Our level of execution was a little bit crisper than it was in the first ballgame. I think we took a step as a football team,” Assistant Head Coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

    Running back redshirt sophomore Denzel Williams scored three touchdowns in the first half of the game and rushed 15 times for 62 total yards.

    “It was a movement upfront really from the line. I hate to take credit for anything that I do because without the line I can’t do anything,” Williams, an undecided major, said.

    Quarterback Michael Eubank completed 15 out of 23 passes for 131 yards with one touchdown in the first quarter.

    In the second half of the game, backup quarterback Carson Bennett completed five out of six passes for 54 yards and one touchdown.

    “Anytime you give guys a chance to get game experience, you get them out there to execute against another team not in a practice situation that helps all the way around from confidence to execution. It helps everyone on your roster. “ D’Ottavio said.

    This win makes the Bulldogs record 1-1. Next, they will face the Virginia Military Institute Keydets in their first conference matchup of the season. The team will not change the way they prepare for the home game on Saturday.

    “We will practice pretty much the same and clean up the mistakes we see on film,” Williams said.

    VMI is 1-2 this season and are coming off of a victory over Davidson. Kickoff is scheduled for 2 p.m. in Seibert Stadium this Saturday.

     

    | September 17, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Faster, better, stronger: new Wi-Fi equipment coming to campus

    wiresby SYDNEY SCROMWELL – Editor in Chief

     

    Junior nursing major Kerith Helms worries about the online quizzes in her nursing classes. The tests are timed and Helms never knows when the Internet connection will fail, leaving her staring at the screen and wondering if the connection will return in time for her to complete the test. The giant spools of black cables around campus, though, might be the answer to her problems.

    The spools hold underground fibers and are part of what interim Chief Information Officer Debbi Whitcomb said is the largest upgrade to campus Internet capabilities in 16 years.

    Over the summer, the board of trustees approved $1.8 million for Technology Services to improve or replace the current network infrastructure. Enterprise Systems Group Director Tim McRae said the upgrade was made possible by overwhelming student support for a better Internet connection.

    “This is one that students can take credit for,” McRae said. “Without feedback through surveys, through questions, it would have never happened.”

    The underground fibers are currently being laid across campus and much of the core network equipment is being replaced. McRae said there’s also enough money to add up to 1,000 new Wi-Fi access points (APs) in heavy use areas or locations where students complained about service, such as the basement of Evergreen Hall.

    Currently, APs on campus have a connection speed of 100 megabytes per second (Mbps), but the new fibers will give each AP its own one gigabyte per second connection to the network. Additionally, each building will have a 10 gigabyte per second connection to the hub of the network, located in Samford Hall.

    “Faster is a relative term, [but] all connectivity within campus will be faster,” McRae said.

    Ethernet speed will also be improved “by a power of 10,” so faculty desktop computers will also benefit from the upgrade. McRae said these changes put together will make Wi-Fi more reliable and “significantly” improve website loading times and video streaming.

    Some of the network upgrades will be less visible but equally important. In addition to the Samford Hall hub, a second Internet connection is being placed in Propst Hall. A generator will also protect the Tech Services data center so that the Internet will continue to work in case of a power outage.

    A new Palo Alto firewall is being installed on Sunday, Oct. 5 to improve campus security. The current firewall has already stopped more than 50,000 security threats in 2014, and the new one will be even better at protecting sensitive information for students and the university.

    “This is leading edge equipment,” Whitcomb said.

    There will be some temporary network outages as Technology Services switches to the new equipment. Helms is not looking forward to the outages, but she’s hoping for a future with less-stressful online tests.

    Junior English major Sarah Sullivan is also excited about the possibility of better, more reliable Internet.

    “Faster is always better,” Sullivan said.

    McRae said Beeson Woods will be switched to the upgraded equipment this week, and either Central Campus or West Campus will be next.

    After that, installation of the underground fibers will determine which areas come next.

    McRae said he plans to have “the vast majority” of the upgrades finished by the end of the semester. To learn more, contact him at twmcrae@samford.edu.

    | September 17, 2014 | 0 Comments

News

Faculty Senate to vote on intellectual property policy

by EMILY FEATHERSTON, News Editor

The faculty senate will vote Monday on a significant revision of Samford’s intellectual property policy.

The proposed policy, provided to the Crimson by business affairs and faculty welfare committee chairman Jennings Marshall, addresses Samford’s use of faculty and student work created at the university or using university resources It also covers ownership of patents for discoveries made by faculty, students or staff.

“We felt it was appropriate and timely to update our intellectual property policy to fit current times,” said Vice President for Business and Financial Affairs Harry B. Brock, III.

Brock said the intellectual property policy has not been updated since the 1990s, and the university felt new language was needed to keep up with changes in technology and teaching methods, as well as the increase in research at Samford.

For students, the policy primarily addresses the university’s rights to use, display, distribute or perform any creative or scholarly work created to satisfy a university course credit. The policy would give the university a “nonexclusive, royalty-free license” to use student works for educational purposes.

“It’s only two sentences, but it’s pretty comprehensive,” chemistry professor and values council member Brian Gregory said.

For faculty, the policy would give the university irrevocable, royalty-free license to use works created for use in university-sponsored courses. This use includes in-classroom use and distribution; use in online programs; educational, promotional or administrative purposes; and to preserve or archive the work. While the policy allows rights to the underlying content to remain the property of the creating professor, the method and manner used to distribute that content belong to the university.

Under the policy, any discovery made during research done on or associated with the university that leads to a patentable invention would also belong to the university. Any revenue resulting from the patent would be divided between the creator and Samford.

The policy also covers “institutional works” produced by both students and faculty for “specific university purposes.” These works include university and student publications such as Seasons and Entre Nous. Under the proposed policy, the university would claim ownership of these publications and works.

“We feel it is a fair and reasonable policy for both the university and faculty and students,” said Brock.

However, several professors have expressed concern with the language of the policy as well as the implications.

Gregory said he feared the changes infringe on students’ rights and open a channel for legal litigation against the university. He said his concerns lie with the use of materials used to determine a student’s grade, such as a research paper, and if this use would be in violation of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).

“If grades are protected by FERPA, the method of determining that grade should be protected,” Gregory said.

Brock said, however, that students would be able to submit a formal request to the university that a specific work not be used, though the process of that submission is not detailed in the policy.

“The intent is not to use anything ‘unflattering’ to the originator,” Brock said.

Other professors are concerned that the policy changes will hinder student and faculty creativity, and create an atmosphere of distrust.

“Overall, the policy has the potential to change the climate of the institution,” communication studies professor Charlotte Brammer said.

Both Gregory and Brammer are also concerned that the policy would violate 17 U.S.C § 106, the fair-use guidelines of U.S. copyright law.

“Fair use is clearly defined for works in the public domain, but it’s tenuous at best for this,” Gregory said.

Brock said, however, that the policy stresses “use” in terms of educational purposes and to “show off” the good work created by students and faculty.

“We’re not looking to create conflict, but simply to preserve a privilege to use in an appropriate fashion,” Brock said.

The policy will go before the faculty senate tomorrow at their first official meeting of the 2014 fall semester. It was read for the first time at the April meeting after being approved by the business affairs and faculty welfare committee. Jennings said the policy was introduced by Brock and Assistant Vice President for Business and Financial Affairs and General Counsel Lisa C. Imbragulio.

After committee members expressed concerns, Jennings said Brock and Imbragulio allowed the committee to nearly rewrite the policy. Jennings said that the revisions were met with support, except from faculty from the McWhorter School of Pharmacy who showed continued concern for the patent policy.

Jennings also claimed that Robert’s Rules of Order, or the official operating procedures for legislative bodies, were violated when amendments to the policy were made after it left committee.

Senate chair and pharmacy professor Erika Cretton-Scott declined to comment on the policy to maintain impartiality before Monday’s meeting.

If the faculty senate approves the policy, it will then go before the entire faculty to be approved at large. After that, it will be have to be approved by the board of trustees.

Students establish American Enterprise Institute

by MARLEY DAVIS – News Writer

michaeltaylorSamford welcomed a new student organization as students founded a Samford chapter of the American Enterprise Institute (AEI), a pro-business, conservative think tank. The organization establishes college chapters to educate students about involvement in politics.

Junior finance major Michael Taylor reached out to AEI because of his own interests in public policy and economics. He aims to bring together Christian fellowship and political organizations into conversation with this think tank.

“Samford students are passionate about faith-based organizations. AEI will raise interest in public policy and discuss how we as Christians can be more active in public policy,” Taylor said.

AEI’s Samford Executive Council is comprised of primarily business and political science majors. Tyler Castle, AEI’s director of student programs, recruited them for the council for their creative and pragmatic thinking styles. These students will organize events on campus with funding from the think tank.

AEI will co-host a seminar Nov. 7-8 with economics professor Art Carden. The topic will be on Milton Friedman’s “Capitalism and Freedom.” In the spring, AEI will host a panel of authors that wrote “For the Least of These: A Biblical Answer to Poverty.”

Although AEI is a conservative think tank, Taylor said its goal is not to promote Republican ideas, but instead to focus on unbiased research from all sides.

“College students are frustrated with corruption and all of the screaming voices in politics. It’s hard to make sense of public policy and often times we end up leaving it to our politicians,” Taylor said. “College students should have a good understanding of public policy from all sides, and AEI will help achieve that.”

 

Run, hide, fight: faculty receive shooter situation training.

by EMILY FEATHERSTON - News Editor

If a shooter ever comes to Samford’s campus, Director of Public Safety Wayne Pittman wants to make sure everyone knows what to do. Pittman is providing faculty and staff with training sessions on ensuring the safety of students and themselves in case of an active shooter or other violent threat situation.

“Who are they [students] going to look to when something happens? They are going to look to the instructor or staff to know what really needs to be done,” Pittman said.

The sessions will focus on the Department of Homeland Security’s “Run, Hide, Fight” video and training program, which can be viewed on the department’s website. In the coming weeks, Pittman and his staff will be working to add to the campus emergency preparedness plans that are already in place. Pittman explained the basics of what this plan will include:

safety

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run

Pittman said that the primary option for those on campus would be to evacuate if at all possible.

“If you’re not here, they can’t harm you,” Pittman said.

RAVE alerts will be used to notify students of any dangerous situation and the exact location that is being locked down. Those not in the affected area should walk or run to evacuation points that will be established soon. Faculty and staff will be available to make sure everyone is accounted for.

Hide

If you are in the affected area on campus, there are steps to prevent coming into direct contact with the danger. Faculty and staff are being instructed to close and lock entrances and barricade the room with any heavy furniture. Occupants should then turn off the lights and remain as quiet as possible.

In the next few week, Pittman and his staff will be meeting with each building coordinator to set up individual emergency plans for every building, which will include methods of ensuring that every door locks and can be additionally secured.

Fight

“If they’re coming in, and you know they’re coming in, everyone in the room needs to take part,” Pittman said.

He recommends that a team of five be designated to attempt to take down the individual. Everyone else should grab something to throw at the attacker and make noise to distract them.

“We hope that this will never happen at Samford, but you never know,” Pittman said.

While these sessions are for faculty and staff education, Pittman recommends that students familiarize themselves with emergency preparedness plans and participate in student sessions that will be offered in the future.

The “Run, Hide, Fight” video can be viewed on the Department of Homeland Security’s website, and Pittman can be contacted at rwpittma@samford.edu.

Faster, better, stronger: new Wi-Fi equipment coming to campus

wiresby SYDNEY SCROMWELL – Editor in Chief

 

Junior nursing major Kerith Helms worries about the online quizzes in her nursing classes. The tests are timed and Helms never knows when the Internet connection will fail, leaving her staring at the screen and wondering if the connection will return in time for her to complete the test. The giant spools of black cables around campus, though, might be the answer to her problems.

The spools hold underground fibers and are part of what interim Chief Information Officer Debbi Whitcomb said is the largest upgrade to campus Internet capabilities in 16 years.

Over the summer, the board of trustees approved $1.8 million for Technology Services to improve or replace the current network infrastructure. Enterprise Systems Group Director Tim McRae said the upgrade was made possible by overwhelming student support for a better Internet connection.

“This is one that students can take credit for,” McRae said. “Without feedback through surveys, through questions, it would have never happened.”

The underground fibers are currently being laid across campus and much of the core network equipment is being replaced. McRae said there’s also enough money to add up to 1,000 new Wi-Fi access points (APs) in heavy use areas or locations where students complained about service, such as the basement of Evergreen Hall.

Currently, APs on campus have a connection speed of 100 megabytes per second (Mbps), but the new fibers will give each AP its own one gigabyte per second connection to the network. Additionally, each building will have a 10 gigabyte per second connection to the hub of the network, located in Samford Hall.

“Faster is a relative term, [but] all connectivity within campus will be faster,” McRae said.

Ethernet speed will also be improved “by a power of 10,” so faculty desktop computers will also benefit from the upgrade. McRae said these changes put together will make Wi-Fi more reliable and “significantly” improve website loading times and video streaming.

Some of the network upgrades will be less visible but equally important. In addition to the Samford Hall hub, a second Internet connection is being placed in Propst Hall. A generator will also protect the Tech Services data center so that the Internet will continue to work in case of a power outage.

A new Palo Alto firewall is being installed on Sunday, Oct. 5 to improve campus security. The current firewall has already stopped more than 50,000 security threats in 2014, and the new one will be even better at protecting sensitive information for students and the university.

“This is leading edge equipment,” Whitcomb said.

There will be some temporary network outages as Technology Services switches to the new equipment. Helms is not looking forward to the outages, but she’s hoping for a future with less-stressful online tests.

Junior English major Sarah Sullivan is also excited about the possibility of better, more reliable Internet.

“Faster is always better,” Sullivan said.

McRae said Beeson Woods will be switched to the upgraded equipment this week, and either Central Campus or West Campus will be next.

After that, installation of the underground fibers will determine which areas come next.

McRae said he plans to have “the vast majority” of the upgrades finished by the end of the semester. To learn more, contact him at twmcrae@samford.edu.

Features

Tolkien Week celebration comes to Samford

by HALLEY SMITH

Don’t be surprised if you see a hobbit walking around campus this week, as the Samford Film Club and the English Honor Society, Sigma Tau Delta, celebrate J.R.R. Tolkien’s contributions to film and literature. Both campus groups are working together to provide students with as many Tolkien-themed events as possible.

Tolkien Week Megan BurrMegan Burr, an organizer for the event and senior English major, said picking this week to celebrate was intentional.

“I’d been looking around at literary anniversaries and stumbled upon this date. We picked this week in particular because September 22 is the official ‘Hobbit Day,’” said Burr. “It’s the birthday of Frodo and Bilbo Baggins.” Because of conflicting events on campus, the students are choosing to celebrate Hobbit style by holding events throughout the week.

“I got Adam Quinn, Sigma Tau Delta’s president, in on it, and so we began. It was a bit of a scramble to get everything ready, but we’re all really looking forward to it,” Burr said.

Students can look forward to two events this week. On Tuesday in SIM forum at 6 p.m., Sigma Tau will be hosting a reading from “The Hobbit” followed by a Middle Earth quiz game. On Wednesday in SIM at 6 p.m., Sigma Tau will host a Tolkien discussion panel for students and faculty followed by a reception with Hobbit themed snacks.

On Thursday in Brock forum at 6 p.m., the Film Club will show “The Fellowship of the Ring” and have a “Lord of the Rings” themed costume contest with prizes.

All events are open to students on campus and any area Tolkien fans.

“It’s going to be totally awesome,” Burr said.

 

Samford student attends New York Fashion Week

NYFW Taylor pigmanby EMILY SARVER

While most students were in class on Sept. 3, senior Taylor Pigman was catching her flight to New York City.

Over the summer, Taylor interned in New York City for PR Consulting, a fashion, beauty and lifestyle public relations firm. Because of her success there, they requested that she come back for Fashion Week and help their clients put on shows.

 

 

Q: Taylor, what was something you learned during your time at Fashion Week?

A: The importance of organization and communication. The show is planned months in advance, and everything is thought through. From the seating chart to your personal duties, everyone needs to know what’s happening every moment.

 

Q: What was your job specifically at the show?

A: I was put in charge of VIP seating.

 

Q: What was your most surreal moment?

A: Rihanna was the big celebrity of the show, so I had to go save her seat in the front row until she arrived and then I greeted her. Across from me was Anna Wintour. Then Rachel Zoe walked by and bumped into me, but quickly apologized. After they, along with Jenna Lyons, all arrived, the cameras really started going and I just couldn’t believe I was around so many fashion idols of mine all at once.

 

Q: Whose show were you there for?

A: The designer Altuzarra. His line actually hits Target stores September 14th!

 

Q: What spring trends do you see coming from Altuzarra?

A: He had a beautiful collection themed, “Finding beauty in dark places.” There was a lot of leather and fringe along with embroidered dresses with beading and pearls. He also showed mixed patterns on the same pieces.

 

Q: Would you want to attend fashion week again?

A: Of course!

 

Q: What are your plans after graduation?

A: I plan on moving to New York City to continue pursuing my dream of working in fashion public relations. The experience showed me that anything is possible if you put yourself out there and send out your resume!

International author Brian McLaren to speak at Canterbury UMC

By RACHAEL HEADLEY, Features Editor

Canterbury United Methodist Church is kicking off their fall speaker series with international author, speaker and activist Brian McLaren at their Overbrook Road campus in Mountain Brook.

The three-part lecture series will begin on Friday night at 7 p.m. with the first session “Reading the Bible in a 21st Century World.”

The remaining sessions will take place on Saturday morning beginning at 9:30 a.m. and ending at 12:30 p.m. covering the topics of Christian identity and mission in a 21st Century world.

Although ticket prices for the event range from $25 to $50, Canterbury is allowing free admission for students. College students do not have to purchase tickets in advance and are asked to only bring a valid student I.D. for admittance.

Canterbury UMC photo credit Wally schmidt“When people are moving into college and are questioning their past and their future, Brian McLaren has something to speak to that,” Canterbury UMC’s director of the Academy for Christian Studies, Oliver Clark said.

When the event’s sponsor, the Southern Progressive Alliance for Exploring Religion (SPAFER), approached Canterbury about the opportunity to host McLaren, Canterbury quickly accepted the opportunity for a variety of reasons.

At another conference, Clark heard McLaren speak and was “very impressed” by his reflections on denomination.

“McLaren said that none of us have it all together and we can learn something from every denomination,” Clark said.

Clark’s hope for the series is that people will attend the event and it will inspire them to dig a little deeper when examining their faith, despite their denomination.

“We are excited that Brian McLaren will be speaking at Canterbury. Having read several of his books, I can testify that this will be a thought provoking, inspiring and possibly challenging event. You won’t want to miss the rare opportunity to hear an innovative Christian thinker of this caliber in Birmingham,” Clark said.

The next speaker in the series, Becca Stevens, will come to Canterbury on Oct. 1 to speak on human trafficking.

On Nov. 16, the final speaker will be Rachel Held Evans covering the topic of the younger generation’s disillusionment with the church.

Canterbury United Methodist Church is located at 350 Overbrook Road, Birmingham, Alabama, 35213.

Tickets and more information can be found at spafer.org or by contacting Oliver Clark:
oliver.clark@canterburyumc.org, 205-868-6580.

 

“Boyhood”: the twelve year film

BoyhoodBy JIMMY LICHTENWALTER

Over the course of two decades and 17 films, director Richard Linklater has firmly established himself as one of the most eclectic working filmmakers. His films cover a variety of genres, narrative style, topics and themes, yet a few things have remained constant across Linklater’s career: his assuredness behind the camera, his love of conversations and most importantly—his knack for portraying characters and their various developments and arcs.

In 2002, true to form, Linklater began working on a project that would follow a boy for 12 years from the time he is six to his high school graduation. Linklater wrote 12 vignette scripts and cast a six-year-old actor and began filming him once every year. This project, known as “Boyhood,” was right in Linklater’s wheelhouse. Not only does the film cater to his gifts as a filmmaker but also is a unique undertaking that fits well with other peculiar narrative films by Linklater, such as “Waking Life,” “Bernie” and the “Before” Trilogy.

A film such as this has the potential to be gimmicky and melodramatic, but Linklater, as he has proved many times before, is above such pitfalls. His newest film is a once-in-a-generation type of film. Epic in some ways and intimate in others, “Boyhood” perfectly captures all the highs, lows, heartbreaks, humor, frustrations and beauties of life.

“Boyhood” begins and ends with the sky, something as expansive and seemingly endless as life itself. Ellar Coltrane stars in the film as Mason Evans, Jr., a young boy growing up in Texas with his single, working mother (Patricia Arquette), his bubbly older sister (Lorelei Linklater) and with sporadic appearances from his musician father (Ethan Hawke).

Of course over the span of 12 years, these things change. Parents are wed (and divorced), children grow older (and sullen), families move (and change). What is truly amazing about the film is watching these characters grow up right before your eyes. Mason isn’t the only character who goes through a series of changes. Every character in the film evolves in some way, whether physically, emotionally or both. Both Arquette and Hawke especially shine as Mason’s parents. When the film ends, their characters have changed just as much, if not more, than Mason. While this is certainly not a knock against Coltrane and his performance, I feel that he had the benefit of playing a variation of his actual self.

The real beauty of “Boyhood” is how accurately it mirrors life. Like every person that has walked this planet, Mason experiences his fair share of achievements and disappointments. Yet, Linklater wisely never lets the film become overly dramatic. Mason’s narrative is not, like many fictional characters, wrought with melodrama and heartbreak. What Linklater does is focus specifically on the small, intimate moments of Mason’s life.

It is here, in these small moments, where “Boyhood” succeeds: a pre-teen Mason balking at a kiss from his mom, Mason camping with his father, Mason’s mother’s devastation as her youngest child leaves for college. While, as a whole “Boyhood” is an epic piece of narrative filmmaking, the film’s real strengths are in these common, completely un-epic moments.

The film also flows in a lyrical manner similar to life. To show the passage of time, Linklater relies on both the changes in his characters and cultural touchstones such as Harry Potter, Halo, iPhones, the Iraq War and Dragonball Z. As someone who is similar in age to Mason, this technique was particularly effective because I lived through these fads and trends.

“Boyhood” has affected me like no film has in quite some time. With his latest film, Linklater certainly has created a new classic. “Boyhood” is filled with a level of humanity that many films today are lacking.

Over the course of two decades and 17 films, director Richard Linklater has firmly established himself as one of the most eclectic working filmmakers. His films cover a variety of genres, narrative style, topics and themes, yet a few things have remained constant across Linklater’s career: his assuredness behind the camera, his love of conversations and most importantly—his knack for portraying characters and their various developments and arcs.

In 2002, true to form, Linklater began working on a project that would follow a boy for 12 years from the time he is six to his high school graduation. Linklater wrote 12 vignette scripts and cast a six-year-old actor and began filming him once every year. This project, known as “Boyhood,” was right in Linklater’s wheelhouse. Not only does the film cater to his gifts as a filmmaker but also is a unique undertaking that fits well with other peculiar narrative films by Linklater, such as “Waking Life,” “Bernie” and the “Before” Trilogy.

A film such as this has the potential to be gimmicky and melodramatic, but Linklater, as he has proved many times before, is above such pitfalls. His newest film is a once-in-a-generation type of film. Epic in some ways and intimate in others, “Boyhood” perfectly captures all the highs, lows, heartbreaks, humor, frustrations and beauties of life.

“Boyhood” begins and ends with the sky, something as expansive and seemingly endless as life itself. Ellar Coltrane stars in the film as Mason Evans, Jr., a young boy growing up in Texas with his single, working mother (Patricia Arquette), his bubbly older sister (Lorelei Linklater) and with sporadic appearances from his musician father (Ethan Hawke).

Of course over the span of 12 years, these things change. Parents are wed (and divorced), children grow older (and sullen), families move (and change). What is truly amazing about the film is watching these characters grow up right before your eyes. Mason isn’t the only character who goes through a series of changes. Every character in the film evolves in some way, whether physically, emotionally or both. Both Arquette and Hawke especially shine as Mason’s parents. When the film ends, their characters have changed just as much, if not more, than Mason. While this is certainly not a knock against Coltrane and his performance, I feel that he had the benefit of playing a variation of his actual self.

The real beauty of “Boyhood” is how accurately it mirrors life. Like every person that has walked this planet, Mason experiences his fair share of achievements and disappointments. Yet, Linklater wisely never lets the film become overly dramatic. Mason’s narrative is not, like many fictional characters, wrought with melodrama and heartbreak. What Linklater does is focus specifically on the small, intimate moments of Mason’s life.

It is here, in these small moments, where “Boyhood” succeeds: a pre-teen Mason balking at a kiss from his mom, Mason camping with his father, Mason’s mother’s devastation as her youngest child leaves for college. While, as a whole “Boyhood” is an epic piece of narrative filmmaking, the film’s real strengths are in these common, completely un-epic moments.

The film also flows in a lyrical manner similar to life. To show the passage of time, Linklater relies on both the changes in his characters and cultural touchstones such as Harry Potter, Halo, iPhones, the Iraq War and Dragonball Z. As someone who is similar in age to Mason, this technique was particularly effective because I lived through these fads and trends.

“Boyhood” has affected me like no film has in quite some time. With his latest film, Linklater certainly has created a new classic. “Boyhood” is filled with a level of humanity that many films today are lacking.

 

Opinion

#community

By MCDAVID MADDOX

If you have spoken with any student in a leadership position, the words “community” and “intentional” most likely found their way into your conversation. Over the past three years at Samford, these words began to develop a negative connotation in my mind and became trite to the point that when mentioned, I would internally roll my eyes. (If you doubt the excessive way these words are used, search #intentional or #community on Twitter.)

However, over the past three months I lived and breathed everything Samford as I met with multiple members of administration, faculty and staff. One truth hit me in the face over and over, again and again: there are like, “lit-e-rally” hundreds of people working year-round to ensure that we, Samford students, have the best possible year. Each one is incredibly passionate about their work. I am grateful, to say the least, to have had the opportunity as your student body president to better know the hands which continually wind the clock that is Samford. Surrounded by the Samford staff, I find myself humbled as I realize how recalcitrant I once was and discover how real our #community truly is.

As my distaste for this word began to melt over the summer months, my full-on adoration of community would come in the wake of great tragedy. I experienced a third-person view of the Samford community during the celebration of the life of Trevelyn Campbell, our divinely talented peer whose smile was infectious. Community is found sitting in the silent unity of a crowd of students, professors and administration collectively mourning the death of a peer. It is found in ad hoc, tear-ridden eulogies given by Trevelyn’s friends. It is found in holding a stranger as she weeps without any sense of awkwardness. In the midst of profound, even unbearable grief, the beauty to be found is in our need for each other, to be comforted, and to know we still come together for a common purpose—For God, For Learning, Forever. #community

Watch the Throne

By JACKSON HOGAN

Kanye West is probably right when he says that he is better than you. Not even a decade has passed since the release of his first album, but the Chi-town rapper-producer has broken, written, re-broken and re-written the rules of hip hop with each of his seven releases, reinventing himself at every turn.

However, you are probably more familiar with Kanye West as the self-aggrandizing, MTV award show crashing, wanna-marry-a-porn-star line spitting Kardashian hubby who names children after navigational directions and claims George Bush hates black people.

Both aspects of Kanye West’s career are of the highest level of cultural significance.

Kanye is the purest concentration of the artist-celebrity: an idol without a single degree of separation between person and art. This tearing of the veil has made him the first and greatest of what will be a long line of public puppeteers — the newest type of Machiavellian —the self-crowned Art Prince.

Examine the conversations that surround the Kimyes, the Brangelinas and the Mileys of the world. Each topic of discussion is generally not about their artistic contributions (which is often their supposed claim to fame); rather, it tends towards personal action, rumor and gossip.

“Did you hear what Lindsey Lohan did last night?” is a much more common statement than “Ms. Lohan’s prowess in Mean Girls redefined what a teen movie can be.” Celebrity-artists often cease to be primarily artists and are rather public displays of personality. They are more known by “private” action than professional accomplishment and are judged more by the relative scandal of a tweet than the content of their work.

Celebrity shatters the artist’s shackles that bind his or her relevancy to the art’s content, resulting in unrestrained artistic freedom. Once an Art Prince earns celebrity, the celebrity can create art without an eye towards public appeal, as their relevancy and their music are no longer mutually dependent. If genius is produced alone in the forest, does it make a sound? The struggle between appealing to the lowest common denominator and creating art is removed when celebrity is the basis of celebrity, not the celebrity’s art. The result is the coexistence of total artistic freedom and fame.

As a relic, celebrity transforms the Art Prince into art. By creating music irrevocably dependent on his gargantuan persona, while simultaneously broadcasting every detail of his existence, Kanye’s art is his music and the narrative of his life as he chooses to write it— whether in the studio, on Twitter, at the VMA awards or in his bedroom. The Art Prince (for better or for worse) is both producer and product, an endless parade, a 24/7 moving picture for the rabid wolf of the American Id to gorge itself upon without pause. The Art Prince becomes an idol at the cost of humanity.

Waves Crashing: The New Fight for Women’s Rights

By FRANKLIN LOWE

On June 8, the American Theatre Wing hosted the 68th annual Tony Awards. Throughout the show I noticed that women were a large topic of conversation; specifically, a call to acknowledge the women who have dedicated their lives to theatre as an art, a business and a mission for social good. Not only did many of the nominees for best play, musical and revival project the image of strong, hard-working women, but both male and female recipients used their few precious moments in the limelight to thank the women—past and present—who have made live theatre a success.

The most moving example of these statements was made by operatic soprano Audra McDonald after she won “Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play” for her role of Billie Holiday in “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”. A beaming but tearful McDonald told the audience, “I want to thank all the shoulders of the strong and brave and courageous women that I am standing on. I’m standing on Lena Horne’s shoulders, I’m standing on Maya Angelou‘s shoulders, I’m standing on Diane Carroll, Ruby Dee and most of all Billie Holiday.”

Perhaps Broadway has finally decided that women make for interesting entertainment, valuable role models and smart investments. However, the number of beauty product ads (Pantene, Dove, and Aerie), TV shows (“Parks and Recreation”) and documentaries (“Miss Representation” and “Girl Rising”) that have begun to preach similar messages of recognition and appreciation suggests that we might be witnessing something much bigger than just a smart media campaign.

For years, many social historians have accepted the theory of the three waves of feminism: suffrage at the turn of the 20th century, Women’s Rights after WW2 through the 70s, and Girl Power in the 80s and 90s. I believe that this summer’s media has shown us that a new, fourth wave of feminism might be crashing through American society.

From highlighting the efforts of women in the arts and politics to identifying the injustices of unequal pay in the workplace, this new wave is focused on the equal compensation for and proper recognition of the efforts that women are making in our society. This wave realizes that women are already leaders in education, business, ministry, the armed forces, the arts and every other single facet of life. It is reminding us that women are not doing great things “for women,” but are doing great things as people.

I wonder, however, if this new wave of feminism will ever come through Samford’s hallowed gates. As much as the faculty and administration might encourage us to embrace the diversity that makes academia fulfilling, we students have decided to stick with traditions that degrade or downplay the efforts of women. Everything – from the way we assume women in certain majors want an “MRS degree” to the way female professors and administers are frequently treated like a Women’s Auxiliary – points to this commitment to leftover gender roles. We hide behind safe words of Southern manners and watered-down morality, but all this does is admit that we are afraid to celebrate the equality and efforts of our female students, faculty and staff. But time is running out. These waves are crashing and it is time to decide – will you jump in or run for cover?

Two Pages

by ADAM QUINN – Opinion Editor

When I came on staff as the Crimson’s Opinion Editor this fall, I was met with one simple but pointed question: why should the Crimson keep its opinion section?

The Crimson is supposed to be a laboratory for JMC students to gain hands-on experience writing, photographing and editing Samford’s news, sports and features—but most opinion columnists (myself included) are not even JMC majors. Instead, we are English majors, political science majors, religion majors and musical theater majors who may not write as journalists ever again.

The Crimson is supposed to be a resource for keeping up with national news, campus events, Samford’s sports teams and useful information for students—but opinion articles discuss and debate ideas, not report on them. This issue alone includes articles about feminism, Starbucks and Kanye West.

The Crimson is supposed to represent the voice of the student body as a whole: our interests, concerns, successes and griefs—but the opinion section is often a place for dissenting views, seldom heard voices and conscientious criticism.

Within this framework of what the Crimson is, the opinion section is notable for what it is not. The opinion section is an anomaly, a misfit, an iconoclast and a rebel. At first glance, we simply do not belong to the mission, the goal or the image of the Crimson. If the newspaper is going to get in trouble, it will happen in the opinion section. If an article is going to cause controversy, it will happen in the opinion section. If someone is going to get mad, upset or even offended, it will happen in the opinion section.

Which is why I love it.

In this year’s opinion section you will see columnists debating different sides of the same topic printed side-by-side to explore all sides of an issue. You will read the opinions of random passerby’s as we ask them what they think about anything and everything. You will read profiles on the opinions of fellow Samford students who may never write an opinion article themselves but still have opinions that we want to hear. You will read the opinions of sixteen different columnists—more than the Crimson’s opinion section has ever had— who will all be clamoring for the chance to write about what they think is important in the world. Hopefully, through each of these new features, the opinion section will more accurately capture the breadth of experience of every diverse type of Samford student and make sure each view has a chance to be heard.

The opinion section is also an opportunity, an invitation, a public soapbox and a catalyst for change. If we are going to celebrate the value of Samford’s community in personal anecdote, it will happen in the opinion section. If we are going to resist narrow-mindedness and conformity, it will happen in the opinion section. If we are going to work together to make Samford everything it has the potential to be, part of that work will happen in the opinion section.

I believe in letting you—male and female, Greek and independent, introverts and extroverts, Samford lovers and Samford skeptics, seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshman—write about your thoughts, your views, your beliefs, your opinions, and, ultimately, your lives. The opinion section is a big risk based on a big idea: to use the opportunity to fill these two blank pages with the inner lives of the people we sit next to in class, stand in line with in the Caf and walk past on Ben Brown every day. I, for one, cannot wait to read what all of you will come up with.

Let’s earn these two pages.

Sports

Football has another record setting game

By GRACE MISEROCCHI

The football team beat the Virginia Military Institute Keydets 63-21 Saturday afternoon in their first conference matchup of the season.

This is the highest the Bulldogs have scored in a conference game and the first time since 1987 they have had two 50-plus point games back-to-back.

“There were some good plays all the way around. It was not just one guy; it was a group. Good football game and team win,” assistant coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

In the first half, Samford scored a school record of 28 points against a Southern Conference team. Junior quarterback Michael Eubank set a record by rushing 11 times for 4 touchdowns and completed 6 out of 9 passes for one touchdown.

“The game plan came together and everything just went as the coaches said it would. They prepared us very well. The blocking up front was extraordinary today,” Eubank, a communications studies major, said.

Junior defensive back Josh Kimberlin made two key interceptions in the first half.

Web Condensed Version“My ultimate goal is to help the team, whatever it looks like, I am going to do my part,” Kimberlin, a sports administration major, said.

Sophomore running back and undecided major Denzel Williams rushed 16 times for a career-high 178 yards. This is his third game in this position.

“Things are flowing a lot better than last week. This position feels like home now,” Williams said.

In the second half, freshman running back and undecided major Krondis Larry scored his first collegiate touchdown. Backup quarterback and redshirt junior Carson Bennett played most of the second half and had 6 attempts for 26 yards.

The Keydet’s quarterback, Al Cobb, completed 18 out of 25 passes for 117 yards. Running back Jabari Turner rushed 15 times for two touchdowns.

Samford will play the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs next Saturday. Chattanooga is 1-2 and coming off a loss to Austin Peay.

“The Southern Conference every week is a battle. There are a lot of good football teams and Chattanooga is certainly a good team. We are going to get ourselves ready to play against an excellent football team,” D’Ottavio said.

Eubank says that they will enter the Chattanooga game with a similar mindset that they had this week, which is to do everything they need to do to keep the ball in their possession.

The Bulldogs will play in Chattanooga Saturday, Sept. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UTC’s Finley Stadium.

Samford Sports Creates a New Slogan

By Grace Miserocchi

The Samford Sports Department has created a new phrase, “Ruff Em,” to represent Samford Sports as a whole.

“We wanted to make something that is uniquely Samford. When you hear Samford, we want people to think Ruff Em. When you say Ruff Em Up, that inspires teamwork and a fight,” said Abby Turner, athletic marketing coordinator.

Samford strong is still the mission and motto, and Ruff Em is meant to be a secondary phrase. However, Turner says that if Ruff Em catches on in the next couple of years that could switch.

Ruff Em infographicThe Samford sports department never officially adopted past phrases such as “bow wow bulldogs” and “paws up” and is trying to create consistency with Ruff Em.

Students have had mixed opinions on the new slogan and have expressed opinions on Twitter with the hashtag #ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm and the parody account Samford Ruff Em.

However, student athletes, including senior football player, Brinson Porter, appreciate the thought behind the slogan.

“I think it is great. The football team loves that they are thinking about us and we have the slogan to fall back on,” Porter, a defensive lineman and finance major, said.

The Sports department is working to spread the new slogan through #ruffem, t-shirts, bracelets and other merchandise. Cheers with “Ruff Em Up” were introduced to the student section at the first home football game last Thursday.

It is short quick and to the point and it is going to do as well as people want it to. It has all the right things to catch on, “ Porter said.

Tweets:

@joshbaker_83: “#ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm salad bar lady.”

@ethan_howard610: “#ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm Samford PD.”

@ruff_em

Football defeats Stillman

DSC_0231By GRACE MISEROCCHI – Sports Editor

The football team defeated the Stillman College tigers 52-0 on Thursday night in its first shutout since 2009.

Samford completed 492 total offensive yards this game. Head Coach Pat Sullivan coached the game from the press box after missing the season opener at TCU because of surgery.

“The guys played well tonight. There were some good things. Our level of execution was a little bit crisper than it was in the first ballgame. I think we took a step as a football team,” Assistant Head Coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

Running back redshirt sophomore Denzel Williams scored three touchdowns in the first half of the game and rushed 15 times for 62 total yards.

“It was a movement upfront really from the line. I hate to take credit for anything that I do because without the line I can’t do anything,” Williams, an undecided major, said.

Quarterback Michael Eubank completed 15 out of 23 passes for 131 yards with one touchdown in the first quarter.

In the second half of the game, backup quarterback Carson Bennett completed five out of six passes for 54 yards and one touchdown.

“Anytime you give guys a chance to get game experience, you get them out there to execute against another team not in a practice situation that helps all the way around from confidence to execution. It helps everyone on your roster. “ D’Ottavio said.

This win makes the Bulldogs record 1-1. Next, they will face the Virginia Military Institute Keydets in their first conference matchup of the season. The team will not change the way they prepare for the home game on Saturday.

“We will practice pretty much the same and clean up the mistakes we see on film,” Williams said.

VMI is 1-2 this season and are coming off of a victory over Davidson. Kickoff is scheduled for 2 p.m. in Seibert Stadium this Saturday.

 

“Kickin’ It For Cancer” an all-around victory

 

By SAM CHANDLER

DSC_1007On Friday evening, a crowd of 1,072 students, parents, and local fans packed the track at the Samford University Track and Soccer Stadium to support the women’s soccer team as they hosted the fourth annual “Kickin’ It For Kids With Cancer” event. Playing in front of a boisterous sea of green that erupted with chants of “Ruff ‘Em Up,” the Bulldogs (3-3-0) emerged victorious in multiple ways

On the field, the Bulldogs earned their first home victory of the season, defeating the Belmont Bruins 2-0. Throughout the first half of play, the Samford women dominated the game, outshooting the Bruins by a margin of 8-1. Although scoring opportunities abounded, it took the Dogs until the 36th minute to strike first. A pass into the box by sophomore business major Anna Allen set up a strike from senior finance and pre-dentistry double major Amanda Abbott. Abbott laced a shot from 10 yards out that deflected off the Bruins’ goalkeeper before bouncing into the back of the net.

The Samford women carried their strong play into the second half, quickly adding the final goal of the night in the 48th minute. On what became the play of the game, sophomore marketing major Jermaine Seoposenwe sailed a gliding shot from the right flank into the upper left corner of the net from an impressive distance of 30 yards.

“I’ll fess up, that was supposed to be a cross,” said Seoposenwe. “But we’ll take anything we get, as long as we get a win.”

Although the Bruins mustered multiple scoring opportunities late in the second half, freshman nursing major Anna Maddox refused to concede a goal. This tallied the first shutout of her young career.

“Anna is getting better and better every day,” coach Todd Yelton said. “We just ask her to give us a great effort, and keep us in the game, and I think she’s certainly done that. I think she’s really come a long way in a very short period of time.”

Off the field, the women’s soccer team achieved another equally important goal. They were successful in raising around $4,000 for the Austin Hatcher Foundation.

The Austin Hatcher Foundation, founded by Samford alum Amy Jo Osborn and her husband Jim, provides no-cost support services to pediatric cancer patients and their families.

Amy and Jim’s son, Austin Hatcher Osborn, passed away from pediatric cancer when he was just nine weeks old.

“He came into the world really quick and was here for a short period of time,” said assistant soccer coach Jay Yelton, a longtime family friend of the Osborn’s. “But you know, the efforts of Amy Jo and Jim to start the foundation has been lasting.”

The proceeds from the “Kickin’ It” event, which were raised through T-shirt sales, a silent auction, and open donations, will benefit the Hope and Cope Drumming Program, a diversionary therapy program at Children’s of Alabama in downtown Birmingham.

“We found that when cancer patients are doing something to distract them, that family is able to bond and spend some quality time that isn’t revolving around this treatment or that doctor,” junior journalism and mass communication major Emily Featherston said. She is the coordinator of the “Kickin’ It” event.

“What we’re trying to do is grow this event to be bigger and involve more of the Samford community and more of Homewood and the area community cause that’s really what our goal is,” Featherston said.