Featured Articles

  • Football has another record setting game

    By GRACE MISEROCCHI, Sports Editor

    The football team beat the Virginia Military InWeb Condensed Versionstitute Keydets 63-21 Saturday afternoon in their first conference matchup of the season.

    This is the highest the Bulldogs have scored in a conference game and the first time since 1987 they have had two 50-plus point games back-to-back.

    “There were some good plays all the way around. It was not just one guy; it was a group. Good football game and team win,” assistant coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

    In the first half, Samford scored a school record of 28 points against a Southern Conference team. Junior quarterback Michael Eubank set a record by rushing 11 times for 4 touchdowns and completed 6 out of 9 passes for one touchdown.

    “The game plan came together and everything just went as the coaches said it would. They prepared us very well. The blocking up front was extraordinary today,” Eubank, a communications studies major, said.

    Junior defensive back Josh Kimberlin made two key interceptions in the first half.

    “My ultimate goal is to help the team, whatever it looks like, I am going to do my part,” Kimberlin, a sports administration major, said.

    Sophomore running back and undecided major Denzel Williams rushed 16 times for a career-high 178 yards. This is his third game in this position.

    “Things are flowing a lot better than last week. This position feels like home now,” Williams said.

    In the second half, freshman running back and undecided major Krondis Larry scored his first collegiate touchdown. Backup quarterback and redshirt junior Carson Bennett played most of the second half and had 6 attempts for 26 yards.

    The Keydet’s quarterback, Al Cobb, completed 18 out of 25 passes for 117 yards. Running back Jabari Turner rushed 15 times for two touchdowns.

    Samford will play the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs next Saturday. Chattanooga is 1-2 and coming off a loss to Austin Peay.

    “The Southern Conference every week is a battle. There are a lot of good football teams and Chattanooga is certainly a good team. We are going to get ourselves ready to play against an excellent football team,” D’Ottavio said.

    Eubank says that they will enter the Chattanooga game with a similar mindset that they had this week, which is to do everything they need to do to keep the ball in their possession.

    The Bulldogs will play in Chattanooga Saturday, Sept. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UTC’s Finley Stadium.

    | September 26, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Wright Center season tickets on sale

    By RACHAEL HEADLEY, Features Editor

    Season tickets go on saleAs the Leslie S. Wright Center’s annual Signature Series kicked off on Friday night, so did the sale of their season tickets.

    The season ticket option, beginning with the inception of the Signature Series four years ago, provides members of the community with a way to guarantee a seat for all 13 performances. Season ticket holders are also given the first opportunity to purchase tickets for non-Signature Series events like Christmas with Michael W. Smith and the Alabama Symphony Orchestra on Dec. 5. Discounts on additional tickets are also provided to holders.

    In addition to the array of guests such as Bela Fleck, Savion Glover and Ballet Hispanico, the Wright Center is also the only place in Birmingham where the Alabama Ballet, Alabama Symphony Orchestra and Opera Birmingham all present at least a portion of their seasons, director of the Wright Center Sean Wright said.

    “A lot of these events, like Arabesque, present only in big cities,” director of external relations Cristina Almanza said.

    Season ticket prices range from $100 to $200 and are pro-rated as the season progresses. The price may also vary depending on seat location.

    “Outside of the shows themselves, I’m excited about how many opportunities there are going to be for Samford students and the community at large to interact with and learn from our artists,” Wright said. “Ten of [the artists] will feature residency activities, and six of the shows will be the culmination of multi-day engagements where the artists will be doing outreach both on campus and in the greater Birmingham area.”

    Tickets and show information are available at tickets.samford.edu, by phone at (205) 726-2853 and at the box office in Bonnie Bolding Swearingen Hall.0

    | September 25, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Proposed intellectual property policy sent back to committee

    By EMILY FEATHERSTON, News Editor

    Intellectual PropertyThe faculty senate voted Monday to send proposed changes to Samford’s intellectual property policy back to committee for significant revision. The policy will also be sent to the academic affairs committee.

    The policy, provided to the Crimson by business affairs and faculty welfare committee chairman Jennings Marshall, addressed Samford’s use of faculty and student work created at the university or using university resources. It also covered ownership of patents for discoveries made by faculty, students or staff.

    “We felt it was appropriate and timely to update our intellectual property policy to fit current times,” Vice President for Business and Financial Affairs Harry B. Brock, III said.

    Brock said the intellectual property policy has not been updated since the 1990s, and the university felt new language was needed to keep up with changes in technology and higher education. Jennings said the policy was originally introduced by Brock and Lisa C. Imbragulio, the assistant vice president for business and financial affairs and general counsel.

    For students, the policy primarily addressed the university’s rights to use, display, distribute or perform any creative or scholarly work created to satisfy a university course credit.

    The policy would give the university a “nonexclusive, royalty-free license” to use student works for educational purposes. The use would be considered a standing agreement, and would remain in effect unless written notice to the contrary is given to the student from the university.

    “It’s only two sentences, but it’s pretty comprehensive,” chemistry professor and values council member Brian Gregory said before the vote.

    For faculty, the policy would give the university irrevocable, royalty-free license to use works created for use in university courses. The policy also covers any discovery made during research done at or associated with the university that leads to a patentable invention.

    “We feel it is a fair and reasonable policy for both the university and faculty and students,” Brock said.

    Several professors expressed concern with the language of the policy before the vote Monday.

    “Overall, the policy has the potential to change the climate of the institution,” communication studies professor Charlotte Brammer said.

    Both Gregory and Brammer said they were also concerned that the policy would violate 17 U.S.C § 106, the fair-use guidelines of U.S. copyright law.

    Junior communication studies major Analeigh Horton spoke to the faculty senate Monday to express these and other concerns of the student honor committee.

    “We understand that Samford, despite its non-profit mission, must include aspects of business to maintain all of its programs,” Horton said in her speech to the senators.

    “However, making this decision will make it seem more commercial than ever and will cause it to lose the personal touch that Samford students and faculty appreciate so much,” she said.

    Brock said that the university’s intention is to use works in an educational way that “shows off” exemplary student and faculty work.

    “We’re not looking to create conflict, but simply to preserve a privilege to use in an appropriate fashion,” Brock said.

    Senate chair and pharmacy professor Erika Cretton-Scott said that the policy will return to the business affairs and faculty welfare committee to address the comments and concerns. It will also go before the academic affairs committee to address concerns that are primarily about teaching or students.

    Cretton-Scott said she encourages students to contact members of the committee to express concerns about the policy. These members include Arts & Sciences representative Malia Fincher (rmfinche@samford.edu), Pharmacy representative Valerie Prince (vtprince@samford.edu), and Education representative Peggy Connell (phconnel@samford.edu). A full list of faculty senators can be found at www.samford.edu/facultysenate.

    | September 25, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Greek life hosts formal recruitment

    Fraternity Bid Day

    Picture 1 of 13

    Members of Alpha Tau Omega welcome their newest pledge class.

    By TEDDY VANCE, News Writer

    Greek Life at Samford University continues to see year after year recruitment records. With the startup of a new ATO fraternity chapter and continued record enrollment, Greek life has had no shortage of students to join their fraternities and sororities.

    The fraternity recruitment process took place from Friday, Sept. 19 to Monday, Sept. 22. Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, ATO and Pi Kappa Phi all had formal recruitment, and Lambda Chi is continuing informal recruitment, which doesn’t have a set bid day.

    “The total number of registered participants for IFC formal fall recruitment was the second highest total for the IFC fraternities in nine years, with over 140 men participating,” Director of Greek Life Denny Bubrig said.

    He also said the primary reason behind the increase of male participants is due to the re-establishment of the ATO fraternity, as well as an increased overall student population.

    Recruitment numbers show that there is a big difference between the amount of females and males participating.

    “The obvious reason for the difference in the numbers between fraternity recruitment and sorority recruitment is due to the Samford female-to-male ratio,” said Julianna Hallman, senior journalism and mass communication major and president of the Samford University Panhellenic Council.

    Panhellenic sororities will have 372 participants in recruitment, another record year for enrollment.

    For Panhellenic sororities, the next few days will see the main events of sorority recruitment process. Wednesday and Thursday of this week will be philanthropy days, Friday will be theme day, with Saturday being preference night and finally leading into Sunday being bid day for sororities.

    Bid day was moved to Sunday to avoid the usual class disruptions that previous years have seen.

    | September 23, 2014 | 0 Comments

News

Venezuelan flute player visits Samford University

By CHRISTY DELENICK, News Writer

World-famous flautist Pedro Eustache will be performing Thursday, Oct. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in Brock Recital Hall during the wind ensemble concert.

Featured on the soundtracks of “Blood Diamond” and “Beverly Hills Chihuahua,” Eustache is a Venezuelan flute soloist who is adept at woodwinds, synthesizers and “world music,” instruments specific to certain cultures. Some of these instruments include the bansuri, a North Indian bamboo flute, the Australian didgeridoo and the Chinese xiao, a traditional bamboo flute. After 35 years of training around the world, Eustache is known for changing genres and going from jazz standards to Mozart and beyond with ease.

After meeting Eustache in the Dominican Republic, Associate Dean of the School of the Arts Kathryn Fouse knew she wanted him to perform at Samford.

“We are excited to present a world class musician,” Fouse said.

Students like sophomore music major and member of the wind ensemble Alina Pitman and junior music major and fellow flautist Holli Gray said that they will have the opportunity to perform for and get feedback from Eustache in a master class setting on Friday, Oct. 3. For the students, working with a master flautist is an opportunity of a lifetime.

“We students will have two days to rehearse in preparation for the concert and then he will come in and improv over us. He will also do a solo piece,” Pitman said.

Professors said that Eustache’s performance at Samford is a wonderful opportunity to be exposed to a talent that defines a generation.

“The Samford flute students and I are very excited to have the opportunity to hear him perform and to study with him,” adjunct professor of flute Barbara Harrington said.

Christian intellectual conference begins

By ASIA BURNS, News Writer

The inaugural “Teaching the Intellectual Christian Tradition” conference begins with Thursday’s convocation.

Sponsored by the Lilly Fellows Program in Humanities and the Arts, the conference is designed to help professors from across the nation in different fields teach rich texts related to Christian ideals in global classrooms. This year’s focus is on the writings of Augustine.

Conference coordinator, University Fellow and senior classics major Rachel Ray said she has been very pleased with the planning of the event.

“I am really excited to get the experience of attending a conference, as well as getting the behind-the-scenes look at how it all comes together,” Ray said.

The 2014 conference will last from Oct. 2 to Oct. 4.

Guest speakers include Peter Iver Kaufman of the University of Richmond and Kristen Deede Johnson of Western Theological Seminary.

Kaufman has published chapters on Augustine in several of his books, including “Incorrectly Political: Augustine and Thomas More.” Johnson is the author of “Theology, Political Theory, and Pluralism: Beyond Tolerance and Difference,” which takes Augustine’s theology and political theory and compares them with contemporary theorists.

“I hope it becomes a tradition [and that] we’ve established something that continues,” Ray said.

Kaufman will also speak during Convocation Thursday, Oct. 2 in Reid Chapel. More information about the conference can be found at www.samford.edu/coretexts.

 

Bid Day 2014 Slideshow

More than 330 women received bids from Samford sororities on Sunday, Sept. 28. They were greeted by their cheering sisters on the Quad after their bids.

Zeta Tau Alpha

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Planetarium gets new technology, shows

By SYDNEY CROMWELL, Editor-in-Chief

Fly from the moon to the NASA Curiosity rover and on to distant galaxies – without ever leaving campus.

The Christenberry Planetarium has upgraded its software and hardware as part of director David Weigel’s plan to expand the planetarium’s appeal to students and the local community.

IMG_1300The new technology includes a high-definition projector, mirrors to match the projection to the curve of the planetarium’s screen and a program that will allow Weigel more control to make customized, interactive shows.

“We’ve gone fully digital,” Weigel said. “We can pretty much pick any point in time, any place on Earth and show what the sky looks like. We can fly through solar systems and show different celestial bodies. We can look at planets, the stars, even satellites orbiting Earth.”

The new system includes high-resolution images of landscapes on the Moon and Mars, including where the Curiosity rover is exploring. Weigel plans to create a show based on the rover and perhaps other space missions. He is also working on a schedule to show films about elementary astronomy and the Cassini spacecraft taking pictures of Saturn and its moons. He is also in the process of making an entirely new “Star of Bethlehem” show for Christmas.

In the future, Weigel would like to add more shows to the planetarium about a variety of topics, such as Alabama and Samford history, the possibility of life on other planets and space weather events like auroras or solar winds. He believes the planetarium, especially with its new upgrades, is a unique teaching tool.

“You’re very engaged in the material since it’s all around you. It’s very cool in that regard,” Weigel said.

Some elementary schools have already signed up for different shows, but Weigel said the planetarium will always be open to free group reservations to show movies or experience an astronomy show tailored to the audience’s interests and questions.

The first demonstration of the planetarium’s new capabilities will be Thursday, Sept. 25 at 8 p.m. The show, “Alabama Autumn Skies,” will teach viewers about the stars and planets visible from campus during the fall.

After the show, Weigel and the audience will take about 15 telescopes out to the Quad to get a better look at the night sky.Weigel plans to make these night shows “a staple” on campus that will happen every couple of weeks.

To learn more, follow the planetarium at @Planetarium_SU or email Weigel at aweigel@samford.edu.

Features

Fall fashion guide

By MAGGIE RHENEY

 

Fall is in the air and before you know it, the weather will be changing more quickly than you can change your wardrobe. Be proactive and add this fall essentials to your closet to be fashion forward and ready for fall.

For ladies:

 Ankle boots.

Ladies, it’s the year of the ankle boot. This fall staple can be both casual and dressy. Pair them with boyfriend jeans or tights and a dress.

Dark lipstick.

Stay in the berry to plum family or venture into a merlot tone if you want an even bolder look. Add gloss but keep the rest of your makeup light and fresh. For the eyes, use a light-colored shadow and a touch of mascara.

Leather.

No fall outfit is complete without leather. A leather jacket is the new fashion must-have for any closet. It’s perfect with jeans and a scarf or thrown over a dress for a great game-day look. If you are feeling adventurous, try leather pants or a leather skirt, or keep things subtle with cigarette pants that feature a leather tuxedo strip or a sweater with leather elbow patches.

Powder blue.

This may seem like a color reserved for spring, but not anymore. It gives a refreshing touch to the usual dark palette for fall. It’s a great color for a sweater, scarf or even nail polish.

Capes.

This doesn’t need to look like the Limited Too poncho you wore in 7th grade. Pair an elegant tailored cape with boyfriend jeans, ankle boots and an oversized bag for a fabulous look.

 

For men:

Flannel.

A classic fall wardrobe piece. Don’t be afraid to go with bold color combinations with your flannel. Pair with dark jeans.

Formal outerwear.

Guys, it’s time to put down the North Faces you’re not in middle school anymore. Step up your outerwear with a bomber jacket, blazer or tailored coat for date night.

Color block sweaters.

Add some pizazz and color to your average fall sweater. Combine earth tones with jewel tones for a sweater that will easily transition into winter.

Wright Center season tickets on sale

By RACHAEL HEADLEY, Features Editor

Season tickets go on saleAs the Leslie S. Wright Center’s annual Signature Series kicked off on Friday night, so did the sale of their season tickets.

The season ticket option, beginning with the inception of the Signature Series four years ago, provides members of the community with a way to guarantee a seat for all 13 performances. Season ticket holders are also given the first opportunity to purchase tickets for non-Signature Series events like Christmas with Michael W. Smith and the Alabama Symphony Orchestra on Dec. 5. Discounts on additional tickets are also provided to holders.

In addition to the array of guests such as Bela Fleck, Savion Glover and Ballet Hispanico, the Wright Center is also the only place in Birmingham where the Alabama Ballet, Alabama Symphony Orchestra and Opera Birmingham all present at least a portion of their seasons, director of the Wright Center Sean Wright said.

“A lot of these events, like Arabesque, present only in big cities,” director of external relations Cristina Almanza said.

Season ticket prices range from $100 to $200 and are pro-rated as the season progresses. The price may also vary depending on seat location.

“Outside of the shows themselves, I’m excited about how many opportunities there are going to be for Samford students and the community at large to interact with and learn from our artists,” Wright said. “Ten of [the artists] will feature residency activities, and six of the shows will be the culmination of multi-day engagements where the artists will be doing outreach both on campus and in the greater Birmingham area.”

Tickets and show information are available at tickets.samford.edu, by phone at (205) 726-2853 and at the box office in Bonnie Bolding Swearingen Hall.0

What’s in my queue? Navigating Netflix like a film critic

By HUDSON REYNOLDS

 

Omar (2013) [NR]Omar

Hany Abu-Assad’s Oscar-nominated romantic thriller follows Omar, a young Palestinian man in Jerusalem, trying to ask his freedom-fighter friend Tarek for his sister’s hand in marriage. After participating in the murder of an Israeli soldier, Omar is arrested and released on the condition of helping the authorities detain Tarek.

The film begins in a rather formulaic manner but soon breaks the mold of a standard thriller with plenty of twists and heartwarming moments to keep the viewer satisfied while remaining realistic. It also offers a perspective not ordinarily seen by viewers: the view of a Palestinian living under Israeli occupation.

 

As Tears Go By (1988) [R]

This low-budget film mixes elements of gangster and romance to ultimately create a highly original crime flick. A notorious gangster named Wah falls in love with his sick step-cousin. While these cousins try to kindle their relationship, Wah struggles to protect a dull-witted subordinate who tries to rise in the ranks of Hong Kong’s crime syndicate.

Though the film contains low picture quality due to its release year and budget, cinematographer Andrew Lau captures the beauty of Hong Kong’s ground level scenery. The meaningful city lighting combined with William Chang’s award-winning art direction creates a colorful spectacle that amplifies Wong Kar-Wai’s tragic tale of the human desire for love and success.

 

Bernie (2011) [PG-13]

Richard Linklater blends satiric melodrama and mockumentary in this bizarre, yet true, story. The much-loved mortician, Bernie (played by Jack Black), tries to help a lonely, insufferable widow in a small Texas town. As their relationship grows, Bernie’s patience begins to dwindle. During a moment of weakness, he murders his elderly companion and quickly hide the body.

 

Offering a hilariously original script and a leading role perfect for Jack Black’s quirky side, this subtle comedy surpasses the gross-out comedies Hollywood enjoys dishing out. Matthew McConaughey and Shirley MacLaine also star in this bold, true-crime story.

 

The Intouchables (2011) [R]

This feel-good, true story follows the relationship between a wealthy quadriplegic and an ex-convict in Paris. When the emotionally and physically handicapped Philippe holds job interviews to find a new caretaker, the struggling Driss applies to get a signature so he can continue receiving welfare checks. To Driss’ surprise, Philippe hires him. Together, they help one another see different sides of life. With great acting and an inspiring, humorous script, this opposites-attract story leaves the viewer with a nice taste of mellow joy.

 

All movies are available on Netflix. “Omar,” “Bernie” and “The Intouchables” are also available on Amazon Instant Video. “Bernie” and “The Intouchables” are available through
Redbox.

Date nights in the Magic City

By KELLI DUNAGAN

Dates can be intimidating, and so can Birmingham when it comes to picking the perfect place to go. With so many options, finding that perfect romantic lighting or utterly relaxing place to call your own can be quite overwhelming.

Dinner and a dollar movie

For a completely relaxed, easy on the wallet first date, go for dinner and a dollar movie. The dollar theater in Hoover is a great option for those with tight budgets, and it shows recent movies for only $1.50 a ticket! For a nearby dining option, try the Taste of Thailand for fantastically authentic Thai fare.

Live music

For a late night date, head downtown and try Slice Pizza or Moe’s Barbeque. Moe’s is great for watching the big game and cheering on your team with your date. After dinner, head to Tin Roof for some live music or down to the Avondale area to relax at any of the up-and-coming lounges.

Night at the BJCC

Romantic date in mind? Birmingham is full of upscale restaurants with impressive chefs and even more impressive food. Hot and Hot Fish Club, Bottega and Satterfield’s will not disappoint. For entertainment, check out what’s going on at the BJCC to see if any big productions are in town. A few upcoming events include “The Book of Mormon” and Blue Man Group.

A night at the theater

A personal favorite will always be Rojo, off Highland Avenue. The atmosphere is relaxed and eccentric and the food is fantastic. Afterwards, the Red Mountain Theater offers a great array of options for a night at the theater. If none of their options interest you, give a show by your fellow Samfordians a go, as their acting proves excellent no matter what on-campus theater.

No matter where you choose to spend your date, get out there and explore. Avoid chain restaurants and cliché meals. Birmingham is full of variety to fill your dates with happiness and, hopefully, love.

Opinion

Let me in

By SYDNEY CROMWELL, Editor-in-chief

A few weeks back, there was an uproar in social media Christendom concerning Michael Güngor’s statements regarding the creation myth found in Genesis. Michael Güngor, lead singer of Güngor–a band tragically only known in the western Christian world for their song “Beautiful Things”–posed in a blog that he does not affirm that the creation myth found in Genesis is literal.

Although Güngor posted this back in February, he recently unleashed his thoughts again in a podcast by The Liturgists (a post-contemplative collection of artists and radio show hosts discussing faith, science and ethics). Upon release of this podcast, churches across America recanted their support for Güngor and bashed him on social media. Churches rid “Beautiful Things” from their Sunday worship set lists in an attempt to “stand firm” in their view concerning the creation myth: that the story is indeed literal. This was the response Güngor received all because he thinks a particular story did not literally happen. That is the love of Christ, right?

Güngor writes, “To some people, you denying the ‘truth’ of a 6,000 year old earth with naked people in a garden eating an apple being responsible for the death of dinosaurs is the same thing as you nailing Jesus to the cross.” Ironically, this is the exact response Güngor received for his thoughts concerning the creation myth. Why? Why is Güngor persecuted for rejecting Biblical literalism?

Because of the question of truth. For Güngor, there are two options for Bib-lical stories such as the creation saga or the Noaic flood. We can “…either throw out those stories as lies, or [we] could try to find some value in them as stories.” In other words, there might be a form of truth within these stories far greater than a so-called “literal truth.” In fact, I would argue that Jesus demonstrated the beauty of a deeper truth through parable.

The crux of the issue, however, is not Biblical literalism or the truth of Jesus’ parables. Rather, the issue is our unwillingness to be wrong and our response to those who we think are wrong. If ‘truth’ is something that is to be fully comprehended, then why are we still searching for it?

Güngor was persecuted for his thoughts by those who thought he was wrong. From what I recall from the gospels, another man was persecuted for not only what he thought and taught. His name was Jesus.

The great Jewish philosopher Abraham Heschel once commented on this idea by writing, “…what is literally true to us is a metaphor compared to what is metaphysically real to God.” We deny the subtle divinity of the Bible when we settle for mere human literalism. Truth exists far beyond and above a literal interpretation of the Bible.

Logan Greenhaw is a junior religion major. Email him at lgreenhaw@samford.edu.

 

With great power

By MICHAEL ARTHUR

 

It is 6 a.m. in Washington, D.C. and the president has been handed a telephone and told by the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that an American military transport carrying doctors and medical supplies has been shot down. Does the administration respond with a drone strike, an air strike off of a carrier or send a Special Forces strike team after the culprit? How does the United States judiciously respond?

The United States has faced this question time and time again and most administrations come to the conclusion that the only appropriate response is the proportional one. For the uninitiated, a proportional response is a military strike that will be powerful enough to deter the enemy or opposition from retaliating, minimizing civilian cost.

Proportionality is one of the many issues that plague the Israeli and Palestinian conflict. Israel has one of the best anti-rocket systems in the world: the Iron Dome. In addition to actually being able to shoot down rockets, Israel has developed an impressive warning system that disseminates information through phone calls, smart phone alerts and emails. This has reduced Israeli causalities to a minimum, around 66, which are mostly soldiers due to the ground offensive in the recent conflict. However, the Palestinian people have suffered around 2,140 casualties, many of them civilians. There is a tremendous disparity between the death tolls, and it begs the question of whether Israel’s methodology fits into the concept of proportional response.

Israel does have the right to defend itself from military aggression at all times, and it is necessary, to prevent further violence, that the Israeli military stops arms from being smuggled into the Gaza strip. The caveat is whether or not Israel can do this without putting civilians at undue risk and whether these operations are able to deter extremists from attacking Israel in the future.

At the moment, it does not appear that periodic incursions into Gaza, or mowing the lawn as some IDF officials have called it, have been effective as a deterrent. Clearly, the continued rocket barrages against Israel show this current operation has yet to succeed. Israel may need to come to the conclusion that full scale military operations in the Gaza strip do little but engender resentment in Palestinians which leads them to create extremist organizations. Israel is not responding with enough force to take out their intended targets; they are responding with enough force to occupy a nation, resulting in extensive collateral damage. Unfortunately this action immediately escalates the tensions in the region. Hamas cannot escalate past a certain capability while Israel has yet to reach their limit.

Israel may find its best option is to restrain itself, continue to develop defensive technologies like the Iron Dome and only utilize precision special operations teams if they need strikes against specific targets. While it may not defeat Hamas, it is a measured ethical response that removes the threat. Israel has to take on the moral responsibility of deescalating the situation because of their overwhelming military superiority.

Find your voice

By MARLEY DAVIS

 

With rush coming to an end, we are all anxiously awaiting the screaming frenzy that is Freshman girls on bid day. The procession will be attended by people of all kinds. By those hoping to see the inevitable fall, by indifferent Independents and by moms with their cameras poised to capture the perfect moment. Each year, this spectacle occurs after weeks of rush practice and anxious waiting. But are girls as vocal in class as they are during rush?

According to Columbia University, female students are more likely to alter how they answer a question in class. When giving an answer, girls will add a tag question such as “isn’t it,” or “don’t you think?” Women’s answers are more likely to be qualified with “sort of”, “maybe,” “perhaps,” or posed in a hesitant manner such as “I guess,” or “I may be wrong.” Women are more likely to attribute their thoughts to another classmate by saying “to go off what ___ said.”

Along with vocal differences, women differ from their male colleagues in terms of physical presence in class. Sheryl Sandberg in her book Lean In explains how female students are less likely to raise their hand but are also less likely to blurt out answers. When female students do answer questions, they are more likely to be interrupted.

Sander Libby at the Chronicle of Higher Education, asserts all of this amounts to less “substantive” interactions with teachers. Girls are more likely to study outside of class while boys are more likely to have conversations with teachers. This reflects how men are more likely to attribute their success to their innate abilities while women attribute it to external factors such as studying or luck according to research at the University of Wisconsin.

One of the main reasons behind this behavior is social pressure. Men have a positive correlation with success and likeability and women have a negative correlation according to studies done by Harvard. The New Yorker’s Ken Auletta stated that “self-doubt becomes a form of self-defense” for women. To downplay their skills and maintain their image, women act in these ways.

Granted, women have come a long way from being rejected from university admission. Currently, females are earning 57% of the undergraduate degrees and 60% of the master’s degrees in the United States according to the National Center for Education Statistics in 2012. While this leads some to believe this is the “end of men,” the success rate of graduating women has not translated into women with higher-end jobs.

While speaking in class may seem trivial, these habits can lead to larger issues in the workplace. Women are less likely to take risks in their career and less likely to ask for a raise. Our self-image reveals itself in these simple ways. When we willingly sell ourselves short, we miss out on a variety of opportunities.

In no way am I saying that all women act this way or that all men are outspoken in class. It’s a tendency that is seen in classes among the genders. As classes start back, take a look and see if you might be doing some of these things, but encourage one another and have confidence in yourself to speak up in class. If we’re paying for this education, take advantage of it. Be wrong and be ok with it. Because at the end of the day, what you put in is what you get out, and Samford requires a lot to be put in up front; and their expectation is to turn out world-class leaders of both genders.

Humans of Samford – Issue 1

Get it together, Dad.

By KATY WARD

In 12 minutes of unexpectedly spent time, I found myself listening to a friend describe his paternal family history. His tangents had nothing to do with me, but the disconnected details sounded like a storybook. The conversation started me wondering about other student’s undisclosed family quirks. Recalling past family weekends at Samford, I think of parents that look generally the same, but did they look the same then as their kids do now, fitting or not fitting certain university caricatures? See if your dad seems to be in the same boat as the five dads these Samfordians talk about.

What were your parents like in college?

Daniel Fox, senior business major:

Daniel“My Dad joined the group ‘Holy Rollers’ who went around tee-peeing professors’ houses. Also, he and his best buddy wanted to keep a three person dorm for themselves, so they put a philodendron plant in the room and marked down that there was a resident in the room named “Philip A. Dendron.” The RA didn’t understand the paperwork, so they moved the third guy to a different room, and nobody figured out that there wasn’t a third resident.”

Sam

 

 

 

Sam Hudson, freshman business major:

“My dad went to school twice in the sixties and dropped out. He was a hippie type… and then had a dramatic change and worked really hard in the early 80s. I visualize him without a shirt and with blue jeans and a leather belt with a nice turquoise belt buckle I’ve heard my uncle talk about.”

 

 

Are you anything like the college version of them?

NathanNathan Graham, sophomore religion major:

“I think my dad was different than me. From what I’ve heard, he was in a fraternity, and when he runs into people from college now, they’re always surprised that he ended up in ministry. But I think most people already know that’s my goal.”

 

 

 

 


Abi Benke, senior music major:Abi

“I’m sure they were less distracted because there weren’t cell phones, social media, the internet, etc. My parents were raised by the generation who fought in and experienced WWII, they were generally raised up to be independent and grow up quickly . . . I think my parents were probably more focused and lived more in the moment. Our generation is constantly bombarded by all the possibilities and opportunities, so much so that we miss out on what is right in front of us, and often don’t make direct choices because we know something else better will come along that might just be more thrilling.”

Sports

Football has another record setting game

By GRACE MISEROCCHI, Sports Editor

The football team beat the Virginia Military InWeb Condensed Versionstitute Keydets 63-21 Saturday afternoon in their first conference matchup of the season.

This is the highest the Bulldogs have scored in a conference game and the first time since 1987 they have had two 50-plus point games back-to-back.

“There were some good plays all the way around. It was not just one guy; it was a group. Good football game and team win,” assistant coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

In the first half, Samford scored a school record of 28 points against a Southern Conference team. Junior quarterback Michael Eubank set a record by rushing 11 times for 4 touchdowns and completed 6 out of 9 passes for one touchdown.

“The game plan came together and everything just went as the coaches said it would. They prepared us very well. The blocking up front was extraordinary today,” Eubank, a communications studies major, said.

Junior defensive back Josh Kimberlin made two key interceptions in the first half.

“My ultimate goal is to help the team, whatever it looks like, I am going to do my part,” Kimberlin, a sports administration major, said.

Sophomore running back and undecided major Denzel Williams rushed 16 times for a career-high 178 yards. This is his third game in this position.

“Things are flowing a lot better than last week. This position feels like home now,” Williams said.

In the second half, freshman running back and undecided major Krondis Larry scored his first collegiate touchdown. Backup quarterback and redshirt junior Carson Bennett played most of the second half and had 6 attempts for 26 yards.

The Keydet’s quarterback, Al Cobb, completed 18 out of 25 passes for 117 yards. Running back Jabari Turner rushed 15 times for two touchdowns.

Samford will play the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs next Saturday. Chattanooga is 1-2 and coming off a loss to Austin Peay.

“The Southern Conference every week is a battle. There are a lot of good football teams and Chattanooga is certainly a good team. We are going to get ourselves ready to play against an excellent football team,” D’Ottavio said.

Eubank says that they will enter the Chattanooga game with a similar mindset that they had this week, which is to do everything they need to do to keep the ball in their possession.

The Bulldogs will play in Chattanooga Saturday, Sept. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UTC’s Finley Stadium.

Football has another record setting game

By GRACE MISEROCCHI

The football team beat the Virginia Military Institute Keydets 63-21 Saturday afternoon in their first conference matchup of the season.

This is the highest the Bulldogs have scored in a conference game and the first time since 1987 they have had two 50-plus point games back-to-back.

“There were some good plays all the way around. It was not just one guy; it was a group. Good football game and team win,” assistant coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

In the first half, Samford scored a school record of 28 points against a Southern Conference team. Junior quarterback Michael Eubank set a record by rushing 11 times for 4 touchdowns and completed 6 out of 9 passes for one touchdown.

“The game plan came together and everything just went as the coaches said it would. They prepared us very well. The blocking up front was extraordinary today,” Eubank, a communications studies major, said.

Junior defensive back Josh Kimberlin made two key interceptions in the first half.

Web Condensed Version“My ultimate goal is to help the team, whatever it looks like, I am going to do my part,” Kimberlin, a sports administration major, said.

Sophomore running back and undecided major Denzel Williams rushed 16 times for a career-high 178 yards. This is his third game in this position.

“Things are flowing a lot better than last week. This position feels like home now,” Williams said.

In the second half, freshman running back and undecided major Krondis Larry scored his first collegiate touchdown. Backup quarterback and redshirt junior Carson Bennett played most of the second half and had 6 attempts for 26 yards.

The Keydet’s quarterback, Al Cobb, completed 18 out of 25 passes for 117 yards. Running back Jabari Turner rushed 15 times for two touchdowns.

Samford will play the University of Tennessee Chattanooga Mocs next Saturday. Chattanooga is 1-2 and coming off a loss to Austin Peay.

“The Southern Conference every week is a battle. There are a lot of good football teams and Chattanooga is certainly a good team. We are going to get ourselves ready to play against an excellent football team,” D’Ottavio said.

Eubank says that they will enter the Chattanooga game with a similar mindset that they had this week, which is to do everything they need to do to keep the ball in their possession.

The Bulldogs will play in Chattanooga Saturday, Sept. 27. Kickoff is scheduled for 7 p.m. at UTC’s Finley Stadium.

Samford Sports Creates a New Slogan

By Grace Miserocchi

The Samford Sports Department has created a new phrase, “Ruff Em,” to represent Samford Sports as a whole.

“We wanted to make something that is uniquely Samford. When you hear Samford, we want people to think Ruff Em. When you say Ruff Em Up, that inspires teamwork and a fight,” said Abby Turner, athletic marketing coordinator.

Samford strong is still the mission and motto, and Ruff Em is meant to be a secondary phrase. However, Turner says that if Ruff Em catches on in the next couple of years that could switch.

Ruff Em infographicThe Samford sports department never officially adopted past phrases such as “bow wow bulldogs” and “paws up” and is trying to create consistency with Ruff Em.

Students have had mixed opinions on the new slogan and have expressed opinions on Twitter with the hashtag #ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm and the parody account Samford Ruff Em.

However, student athletes, including senior football player, Brinson Porter, appreciate the thought behind the slogan.

“I think it is great. The football team loves that they are thinking about us and we have the slogan to fall back on,” Porter, a defensive lineman and finance major, said.

The Sports department is working to spread the new slogan through #ruffem, t-shirts, bracelets and other merchandise. Cheers with “Ruff Em Up” were introduced to the student section at the first home football game last Thursday.

It is short quick and to the point and it is going to do as well as people want it to. It has all the right things to catch on, “ Porter said.

Tweets:

@joshbaker_83: “#ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm salad bar lady.”

@ethan_howard610: “#ThingsCoolerThanRuffEm Samford PD.”

@ruff_em

Football defeats Stillman

DSC_0231By GRACE MISEROCCHI – Sports Editor

The football team defeated the Stillman College tigers 52-0 on Thursday night in its first shutout since 2009.

Samford completed 492 total offensive yards this game. Head Coach Pat Sullivan coached the game from the press box after missing the season opener at TCU because of surgery.

“The guys played well tonight. There were some good things. Our level of execution was a little bit crisper than it was in the first ballgame. I think we took a step as a football team,” Assistant Head Coach Bill D’Ottavio said.

Running back redshirt sophomore Denzel Williams scored three touchdowns in the first half of the game and rushed 15 times for 62 total yards.

“It was a movement upfront really from the line. I hate to take credit for anything that I do because without the line I can’t do anything,” Williams, an undecided major, said.

Quarterback Michael Eubank completed 15 out of 23 passes for 131 yards with one touchdown in the first quarter.

In the second half of the game, backup quarterback Carson Bennett completed five out of six passes for 54 yards and one touchdown.

“Anytime you give guys a chance to get game experience, you get them out there to execute against another team not in a practice situation that helps all the way around from confidence to execution. It helps everyone on your roster. “ D’Ottavio said.

This win makes the Bulldogs record 1-1. Next, they will face the Virginia Military Institute Keydets in their first conference matchup of the season. The team will not change the way they prepare for the home game on Saturday.

“We will practice pretty much the same and clean up the mistakes we see on film,” Williams said.

VMI is 1-2 this season and are coming off of a victory over Davidson. Kickoff is scheduled for 2 p.m. in Seibert Stadium this Saturday.