Featured Articles

  • Sodexo addresses concerns

    Sodexo

    By EMILY FEATHERSTON – New Editor

    After 11 years of working with Campus Dining, Inc. the university’s contract came under review. After a review of student and faculty opinions, the university offered a contract to Sodexo that took effect Aug. 1. Samford Sodexo General Manager Brent Bolton addressed some of the many questions expressed by students and faculty:

     

    1. When will the Caf be renovated?
    2. Bolton said renovations to the design and layout of The Caf are expected to begin in December, and completed before the Spring 2015 semester begins.

     

    1. What is “Take 4” and when will those options be available in The Caf?
    2. “Take 4” will be a dedicated take-out service for students and faculty pressed for time. The project is tentatively set to begin at the beginning of October. “It should be finished within three to four weeks from the start of construction,” Bolton said.

     

    1. When will the Starbucks and Einstein’s Bros. Bagel Shop arrive?
    2. The Starbucks “refresh” will begin soon, with a completion date of Oct. 1. The Einstein’s Bros. Bagel Shop construction will begin in October and be completed before students come back for Spring 2015. “These are tentative dates and these may be revised based on construction or permitting delays,” Bolton said.

     

    1. Why is there so much pasta?
    2. Bolton said that Sodexo conducted surveys locally and at other universities, and pasta was at the top of students’ list of requests. “We offer the Pasta Bar as an alternative or side to complement your meal,” Bolton said.

     

    1. What is your staff doing to combat long lines and food shortages?
    2. Bolton said the shortages of food have been addressed and will be monitored to prevent future shortages. “We are always communicating with our staff to keep the service stations properly stocked and ready for the volume of customers at key times throughout the meal,” Bolton said. He also said they have added larger fruit displays and adjusted milk inventories to meet the demand.

     

    1. Is there any way that students and faculty can make suggestions or requests?
    2. The Sodexo staff is in the planning stages of forming a student Culinary Council to help with key decisions surrounding the dining program.

    Junior finance major Drew Jackson already engaged the Sodexo staff this semester by requesting to have Froot Loops added to the cereal options. In less than two weeks, Froot Loops could be seen in The Caf.

     

    “It’s very encouraging to see they actually listen to student feedback, and I think Sodexo is doing a great job,” Jackson said.

    | September 11, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • “Kickin’ It For Cancer” an all-around victory

     

    By SAM CHANDLER

    DSC_1007On Friday evening, a crowd of 1,072 students, parents, and local fans packed the track at the Samford University Track and Soccer Stadium to support the women’s soccer team as they hosted the fourth annual “Kickin’ It For Kids With Cancer” event. Playing in front of a boisterous sea of green that erupted with chants of “Ruff ‘Em Up,” the Bulldogs (3-3-0) emerged victorious in multiple ways

    On the field, the Bulldogs earned their first home victory of the season, defeating the Belmont Bruins 2-0. Throughout the first half of play, the Samford women dominated the game, outshooting the Bruins by a margin of 8-1. Although scoring opportunities abounded, it took the Dogs until the 36th minute to strike first. A pass into the box by sophomore business major Anna Allen set up a strike from senior finance and pre-dentistry double major Amanda Abbott. Abbott laced a shot from 10 yards out that deflected off the Bruins’ goalkeeper before bouncing into the back of the net.

    The Samford women carried their strong play into the second half, quickly adding the final goal of the night in the 48th minute. On what became the play of the game, sophomore marketing major Jermaine Seoposenwe sailed a gliding shot from the right flank into the upper left corner of the net from an impressive distance of 30 yards.

    “I’ll fess up, that was supposed to be a cross,” said Seoposenwe. “But we’ll take anything we get, as long as we get a win.”

    Although the Bruins mustered multiple scoring opportunities late in the second half, freshman nursing major Anna Maddox refused to concede a goal. This tallied the first shutout of her young career.

    “Anna is getting better and better every day,” coach Todd Yelton said. “We just ask her to give us a great effort, and keep us in the game, and I think she’s certainly done that. I think she’s really come a long way in a very short period of time.”

    Off the field, the women’s soccer team achieved another equally important goal. They were successful in raising around $4,000 for the Austin Hatcher Foundation.

    The Austin Hatcher Foundation, founded by Samford alum Amy Jo Osborn and her husband Jim, provides no-cost support services to pediatric cancer patients and their families.

    Amy and Jim’s son, Austin Hatcher Osborn, passed away from pediatric cancer when he was just nine weeks old.

    “He came into the world really quick and was here for a short period of time,” said assistant soccer coach Jay Yelton, a longtime family friend of the Osborn’s. “But you know, the efforts of Amy Jo and Jim to start the foundation has been lasting.”

    The proceeds from the “Kickin’ It” event, which were raised through T-shirt sales, a silent auction, and open donations, will benefit the Hope and Cope Drumming Program, a diversionary therapy program at Children’s of Alabama in downtown Birmingham.

    “We found that when cancer patients are doing something to distract them, that family is able to bond and spend some quality time that isn’t revolving around this treatment or that doctor,” junior journalism and mass communication major Emily Featherston said. She is the coordinator of the “Kickin’ It” event.

    “What we’re trying to do is grow this event to be bigger and involve more of the Samford community and more of Homewood and the area community cause that’s really what our goal is,” Featherston said.

    | September 9, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Samford welcomes Latino organization

     

    By VICTORIA HEYERCopy Editor

    10435978_10152394410872881_6336586725755702800_nMelody Martinez, senior human development and family science major, and Fernanda Herrera, sophomore international relations major, both noticed something missing from the many organizations at Samford.

    “My grandmother, who lives in Mexico… asked me about the Latino community at Samford,” Herrera said. “She was so taken aback when I told her there was not one formally in place, even though there were several Latinos on campus.”

    Dr. Carlos Alemán, history professor and a Nicaraguan native, noticed the same lack of Latino support. He sent an email to both women asking if they would like to start a club for Latinos on campus, with him as the faculty advisor.

    “The students themselves proved to be excited about the idea and ran with it,” Alemán said. “I offer support and encouragement.”

     

    “I was so excited when I got the email because there isn’t anything on campus that is focused on Latinos,” Martinez said. “I felt like this was a way I could meet other Latinos on campus and make new friends.”

    Herrera agreed that the club would be an excellent opportunity.

    “Through LSO, I can share my culture with other Latinos who have similar life goals as mine and we can in turn share our unique cultures with others,” she said.

    “I think this will be a very important organization for the campus because it will raise awareness and show that there is more diversity on campus… I’m so excited to… learn more about not only my culture but other Latino cultures as well,” Martinez said.

    Claire Gaxiola, junior international relations major and member of LSO, said the club “is going to be a great way for students and professors to learn more about Latin America, its people and just how close to home its culture really is.”

    Alemán also has hopes for LSO’s role on campus in that it could help with student retention rates.

    “Having a group in which students can discuss and share their experiences on campus, many of them first generation college students, is an important way of helping them feel welcome and making sure they succeed at Samford,” he said.

    The club has events planned including film screenings that will be worth convocation credits. Two of these films will be during Hispanic Heritage month and will involve immigration. They also have more ambitious goals to make positive changes off campus.

    “One of my biggest hopes is that we can work with the Latino community in Birmingham and raise awareness for the importance of higher education in the Latino community as well as encourage them to apply for colleges,” Herrera said. “I feel that members of the Samford LSO can serve as good mentors to young Latinos in the area.”

    Both Herrera and Martinez were part of a four-person team that drafted the constitution for LSO and are running to be president and vice president of the club. The women say that their ambition is to make all of their plans for the Samford Latino Community come to realization.

    | September 9, 2014 | 0 Comments
  • Math professor Foreman remembered for humor, kindness

    SYDNEY CROMWELLNews Writer

    Mathematics professor David Foreman passed away after a long battle with cancer on Thursday, May 1. (Photo courtesy of Gregory Kawell, Computer Science)

    Mathematics professor David Foreman passed away after a long battle with cancer on Thursday, May 1. (Photo courtesy of Gregory Kawell, Computer Science)

    Mathematics professor David Foreman died on Thursday, May 1 after an extended battle with cancer. Foreman had been part of the mathematics and computer science department since 1986.

    Foreman is survived by his wife and his daughters Julie and Emily. His funeral is set for 2 p.m. today at Brookwood Baptist Church. Additionally, a Samford memorial will take place in Reid Chapel on Monday, May 12 at 3 p.m.

    Students and professors have been leaving notes of remembrance on his office door in Ingalls Hall and sharing their favorite memories about Foreman.

    Mathematics professor Jeffrey Powell recalled Foreman’s quick wit, which made staff meetings and classes a fun time.

    “He had a really dry, great sense of humor,” said mathematics professor Jeffrey Powell.

    “Students absolutely loved him. [They were] always going on about how funny he is and he just really made that connection with them in a way that’s really unique.”

    “Anyone who has taken Dr. Foreman for a class knows of his humor. I wish I had written some of his classic jokes down,” said senior mathematics major Corey Fuller. “But more important than the humor was that he made me feel loved as a student and I knew I could stop by his office to just chat whenever I wanted to.”

    Fuller said Foreman never failed to ask about his internship and offered help for classes whenever he could.

    “I hope the Lord uses me to touch as many lives as he was able to touch,” Fuller said. “He never wanted to quit teaching. He knew of his disease and yet still pursued teaching his students until the end. I loved Dr. Foreman and I respected him as the selfless leader he was.”

    Professor Bruce Atkinson, the chair of the mathematics and computer science department, remembered Foreman’s constant selflessness and ability to put others at ease.

    “He was very kind and self-effacing. Whenever I would greet him in the hall he would always want to know what I was doing and how the family was. We would talk about that a while and then I would realize that he would never initiate anything about himself unless he was asked,” Atkinson said. “He lived his life by putting others first.”

    Atkinson said that during the department’s annual awards picnic, Foreman always emceed the “math Pictionary” game.

    “He loved picking the words or phrases, and was in his element in front of the crowd,” Atkinson said. “Last month we had the picnic while he was still ill, and we decided not to even attempt that game. No one could do it better.”

    Junior mathematics major Gary Gao met Foreman during his Calculus 2 class. When he struggled with the class, Gao began spending extra time in Foreman’s office to work on math problems and share jokes. Foreman continued to help him with other math courses and talk about his future. Gao remembered one day, after missing a couple 8 a.m. math classes, Foreman took his phone and recorded his own voice as an alarm clock to make sure Gao got to class on time.

    “I really enjoyed his classes a lot. I loved his classes because he explains everything so well and he’s always willing to stop and spend half an hour if someone has a problem. He’s a great person. We were really close after class,” Gao said. “Our relationship was beyond just professor and student.”

    Only a few weeks before Foreman passed away, Gao had decided to delay his graduation in order to take his senior seminar with his favorite math professor.

    “After hearing he died, I went to his office and stood in front of his door and wrote something on a sticky note. It said, “Dr. Foreman, you are the best,” Gao said. “I just stood there at his door and cried for a while.”

    Mathematics professor Emily Hynds said Foreman was popular among students both for his sense of humor and his ability to explain challenging concepts. Since his death, Hynds has heard from former students who loved him even if they received a failing grade. Foreman won Samford’s John M. Buchanan Award for Excellence in Teaching in 2010 based on the nominations of his students.

    “He’s the kind of professor that students don’t forget. So 20, 25 years later they still come back to see him, they still email him,” Hynds said. “Not even math majors, necessarily; some of these are students he had for one class, but he impacted them so much that he wanted to keep up with them.”

    Foreman was also a source of advice for his fellow professors, as he had been in the department the longest.

    “He gave great advice. He would know how to handle a situation,” Hynds said. “He was just everybody’s friend, mentor, confidant, joke factory.”

    2013 mathematics alumnus Josh Brandl remembered the way Foreman’s office door was always open so he could greet students as they walked by. In classes, Brandl said Foreman struck the “perfect balance” between recognizing students’ current abilities and pushing them to grow.

    “He had this habit of stopping midway through a problem and waiting for someone to finish up the explanation for him. At first I found it a little frustrating; I am not a very outspoken person, and he would literally not move until someone chimed in with some sort of response,” Brandl said. “After a while, though, we all picked up on what he was doing: he wanted us to think through the problems ourselves and to practice explaining our reasoning.”

    When Brandl and fellow 2013 mathematics alumnus Evan Elmore graduated, their church, Brookwood Baptist, held a “Graduation Sunday” to celebrate the college graduates. Their own parents could not attend, so Foreman and his wife Elvia acted as their substitute parents for the day.

    “I remember Evan and I being called to the stage, and then turning around and seeing the proud look on Dr. Foreman’s face when we were both up there,” Brandl said. “Seeing how proud he was made me feel like I had really accomplished something in my time at Samford.”

    | May 7, 2014 | 0 Comments

News

Sodexo addresses concerns

Sodexo

By EMILY FEATHERSTON – New Editor

After 11 years of working with Campus Dining, Inc. the university’s contract came under review. After a review of student and faculty opinions, the university offered a contract to Sodexo that took effect Aug. 1. Samford Sodexo General Manager Brent Bolton addressed some of the many questions expressed by students and faculty:

 

  1. When will the Caf be renovated?
  2. Bolton said renovations to the design and layout of The Caf are expected to begin in December, and completed before the Spring 2015 semester begins.

 

  1. What is “Take 4” and when will those options be available in The Caf?
  2. “Take 4” will be a dedicated take-out service for students and faculty pressed for time. The project is tentatively set to begin at the beginning of October. “It should be finished within three to four weeks from the start of construction,” Bolton said.

 

  1. When will the Starbucks and Einstein’s Bros. Bagel Shop arrive?
  2. The Starbucks “refresh” will begin soon, with a completion date of Oct. 1. The Einstein’s Bros. Bagel Shop construction will begin in October and be completed before students come back for Spring 2015. “These are tentative dates and these may be revised based on construction or permitting delays,” Bolton said.

 

  1. Why is there so much pasta?
  2. Bolton said that Sodexo conducted surveys locally and at other universities, and pasta was at the top of students’ list of requests. “We offer the Pasta Bar as an alternative or side to complement your meal,” Bolton said.

 

  1. What is your staff doing to combat long lines and food shortages?
  2. Bolton said the shortages of food have been addressed and will be monitored to prevent future shortages. “We are always communicating with our staff to keep the service stations properly stocked and ready for the volume of customers at key times throughout the meal,” Bolton said. He also said they have added larger fruit displays and adjusted milk inventories to meet the demand.

 

  1. Is there any way that students and faculty can make suggestions or requests?
  2. The Sodexo staff is in the planning stages of forming a student Culinary Council to help with key decisions surrounding the dining program.

Junior finance major Drew Jackson already engaged the Sodexo staff this semester by requesting to have Froot Loops added to the cereal options. In less than two weeks, Froot Loops could be seen in The Caf.

 

“It’s very encouraging to see they actually listen to student feedback, and I think Sodexo is doing a great job,” Jackson said.

New parking for West, Central campus

By SYDNEY CROMWELL – Editor-in-Chief

Commuters and West and Central Campus residents are about to get 166 new parking spaces. The board of trustees and the City of Homewood have approved a plan for four new permanent parking lots.

The temporary gravel lot next to the University Center will be paved and will have space for 26 cars. The dirt construction road between the baseball and softball fields is going to be widened and paved as well, adding about 45 parking spaces.

West Village’s parking is also expanding. Harry B. Brock III, the vice president for business and financial affairs, said the house near the west gate is no longer occupied and will be torn down. Around 80 parking spaces will replace the home.

COLOR SU-Campus-Parking-composite-1The most complex project will be a parking lot on the north side of campus, in a space currently occupied by facilities management and maintenance. Part of the maintenance facility will be removed and its offices and shops will be moved to an unfinished area under the freshman parking deck. A parking lot of 44 spaces will replace the relocated facility.

Brock said this was part of Samford’s original plan when the parking deck was built in 2007, but it had been postponed until there was a greater need for new parking. Part of the current maintenance facility will also be used as studios, offices and storage space for the art department.

The new lots are primarily being built to relieve commuters’ parking strain, but Brock said they are intended “to be available for all additional student parking.”

Cindy Haile, the assistant director of transportation services, said the freshman deck has also been opened to commuters and two rows of West Village parking near Lakeshore Drive are available to any permit as a temporary solution.

The parking project will cost around $7.3 million to complete and Brock said the university is “ready to begin immediately” once it finds a contractor. He anticipated that all four lots will be open by summer 2015.

“I think some of it will be finished this semester,” Brock said. “All of it will be done this year.”

Business school construction continuing on schedule

By MEGAN LIGHT – News Copy Editor

Construction for the new Brock School of Business building is still underway this semester.

Dean and Professor of Finance J. Howard Finch spoke to students and faculty Tuesday, Sept. 2, in Harry’s Coffeehouse about the progress and future plans for the building.

BSOB Beam Signing“The building is on track,” Finch said. Much of the construction was completed during the summer and Finch said that the construction has gone well so far.

Construction of the exterior of the school is set to finish this semester. After that, the interior of the building will be developed, and is expected to be completed next summer.

The new business school will feature several new amenities that both students and guests will enjoy: two computer teaching labs, a student business incubator and a community resource forum with enough space for up to 400 guests that will be used for receptions and meetings.

“The plan is to move in this summer in time for us to have Fall 2015 classes in there,” Finch said. “I don’t see any reason why we would not be able to make that schedule.”

During the event, each attending student had the chance to sign the last beam that will be installed into the new building.

Donations for the new building are still being accepted on the business school website. More information about the new building and a live webcast of the construction are also available at samford.edu/business.

Artwork, endowed scholarship created in honor of Trevelyn Campbell

Students share poems and Bible verses at Trevelyn Campbell's memorial.

Students share poems and Bible verses at Trevelyn Campbell’s memorial. Photo by Samantha Nelson.

SYDNEY CROMWELL – Editor-in-Chief

Around 130 people gathered in Reid Chapel at 9 p.m. Sunday night for a prayer vigil honoring Trevelyn Campbell. Students and professors shared stories about the junior fine arts major, who was remembered as a caring friend, lover of selfies and a brilliant artist.

“She was the real deal,” said Larry Thompson, the chair of the art department. He recalled his last conversation with Campbell and the way she practically skipped to color guard practice despite the August heat.

Students also read Bible verses and poems, and members of the band played “It Is Well With My Soul” in her honor. Everyone at the vigil was given a card so they could write or draw to express their emotions and thoughts about Campbell’s passing. They could then choose to leave their cards on the chapel altar to be included in an art installation.

The marching band performs "It Is Well With My Soul."

The marching band performs “It Is Well With My Soul.” Photo by Samantha Nelson.

The installation will hang in the Buchanan Hall lobby through the month of September and then be given to Campbell’s parents.

Art professor Kathryn Kauffman also announced the creation of an endowed memorial scholarship for art students so that Campbell would not be forgotten. Kauffman said a donation drive will begin in the coming weeks.

Campbell’s funeral will be Wednesday, Aug. 27 at 1 p.m. at Briarwood Presbyterian Church.

Features

The Guide for Game Day

By EMILY SARVER

While Samford University may be new to the tailgating scene, they are not lacking much. From the free gear to big screen TVs, school spirit has exploded in recent years. What began as a small gathering in the parking lot has now turned into a largely attended event on the Quad. If you have not experienced tailgating yet, here are a few must-haves for this fall.TAILGATING-3

  • Ray Ban sunglasses – The bright sun can be rather unbearable for your eyes. Do yourself a favor and make an investment in these UV ray protectors.
  • Sunscreen – We are all fair skinned when it comes to the Alabama sun, so make sure to lather up before game time.
  • Plastic cups – Here’s a chance to show your Samford Spirit. Get a Samford bulldog cup so you don’t have to worry about finding a koozie.
  • Free food – Don’t know where to find the goods? ResLife always offers free hamburgers or hotdogs along with chips and dessert. Want more food? Make sure to visit all of the campus organization tents on the quad for a variety of options.
  • Attire – Ladies: Dresses are everywhere on game day. They are also the coolest thing to wear to beat the heat, but don’t go overboard with the shoes. Remember we are on the quad and not the runway. Guys: PREPPY. PREPPY. PREPPY. Need I say more?

Office of Spiritual Life offers weekly day of prayer

By RACHAEL HEADLEY, Features Editor

Office of Spiritual Life intern, Nicole Smith, and Minister to Students, Renee Pitts, felt that there was a missing link in the spiritual community at Samford last semester.

IMG_0451Although there are a variety of campus ministries and community churches available, Smith and Pitts wanted to create a new way for students and faculty to connect through prayer. With this inspiration, they designated a one-hour window for the campus to come together and pray.

The new gathering, currently known as “Campus Prayer,” kicked off on September 3, and will be held every Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Reid Chapel. During this hour, attendees are invited to pray for the campus, the country and the world. Attendees are also invited to come and go as needed during the gathering, Smith and Pitts said.

The idea for Campus Prayer came to Pitts when remembering how powerful prayer services had been during times of struggle and tragedy on campus. She began to think that the same power and sense of community could be achieved through weekly meetings.

“Even if only five people come, we consider that a blessing,” Pitts said.

The prayer times have a loose format and every gathering will be different depending on what is going on in the world, Smith said. Each week, leaders let prayer topics evolve naturally with current events and the things that they feel are “pressed upon their hearts.” In the first meeting, the group prayed specifically for the health and safety of Samford athletes and the cessation of urban violence.

“We are all connected… We are all made in the image of God,” Pitts said. “Gathering as a community gives us strength.”

Smith and Pitts also thought through the timing of Campus Prayer and decided that the midweek time is perfect for the purpose of the meetings, Smith said.

“Wednesday can be a day when you’re over the excitement of a new week and you’re ready for the weekend,” Smith said. “It seemed like a good time to really pray through all of that.”

The new program’s tagline is, “gathering together to pray for this campus and beyond,” Smith said. Smith and Pitts also said they both hope to see the Spirit move through the attendees and even make way for small groups to form outside of the weekly meeting.

Currently, Smith and Pitts are the only official leaders for the new program and are in the process of garnering volunteers to help lead the meetings.

“We took a risk,” Smith said, “and now we’ll see what happens.”

Samford welcomes Latino organization

 

By VICTORIA HEYERCopy Editor

10435978_10152394410872881_6336586725755702800_nMelody Martinez, senior human development and family science major, and Fernanda Herrera, sophomore international relations major, both noticed something missing from the many organizations at Samford.

“My grandmother, who lives in Mexico… asked me about the Latino community at Samford,” Herrera said. “She was so taken aback when I told her there was not one formally in place, even though there were several Latinos on campus.”

Dr. Carlos Alemán, history professor and a Nicaraguan native, noticed the same lack of Latino support. He sent an email to both women asking if they would like to start a club for Latinos on campus, with him as the faculty advisor.

“The students themselves proved to be excited about the idea and ran with it,” Alemán said. “I offer support and encouragement.”

 

“I was so excited when I got the email because there isn’t anything on campus that is focused on Latinos,” Martinez said. “I felt like this was a way I could meet other Latinos on campus and make new friends.”

Herrera agreed that the club would be an excellent opportunity.

“Through LSO, I can share my culture with other Latinos who have similar life goals as mine and we can in turn share our unique cultures with others,” she said.

“I think this will be a very important organization for the campus because it will raise awareness and show that there is more diversity on campus… I’m so excited to… learn more about not only my culture but other Latino cultures as well,” Martinez said.

Claire Gaxiola, junior international relations major and member of LSO, said the club “is going to be a great way for students and professors to learn more about Latin America, its people and just how close to home its culture really is.”

Alemán also has hopes for LSO’s role on campus in that it could help with student retention rates.

“Having a group in which students can discuss and share their experiences on campus, many of them first generation college students, is an important way of helping them feel welcome and making sure they succeed at Samford,” he said.

The club has events planned including film screenings that will be worth convocation credits. Two of these films will be during Hispanic Heritage month and will involve immigration. They also have more ambitious goals to make positive changes off campus.

“One of my biggest hopes is that we can work with the Latino community in Birmingham and raise awareness for the importance of higher education in the Latino community as well as encourage them to apply for colleges,” Herrera said. “I feel that members of the Samford LSO can serve as good mentors to young Latinos in the area.”

Both Herrera and Martinez were part of a four-person team that drafted the constitution for LSO and are running to be president and vice president of the club. The women say that their ambition is to make all of their plans for the Samford Latino Community come to realization.

Finals week: study healthier, not harder

LAUREN HUNT – Features Writer

As finals week approaches, many students are planning their strategies for studying. Students are tempted to drink large quantities of caffeine to stay awake longer. Even worse, some students choose to take prescription pills such as Adderall to help them stay focused and alert. These may seem like harmless actions that will improve mental capacity, but the side effects could potentially be fatal.

Drinking large quantities of caffeine to stay up and study is harmful to the cardiovascular system. Dr. Mark Ticola, Samford’s full-time physician at University Health Services, said caffeine accelerates the heart rate and, at a high enough quantity, can cause potentially fatal heart conditions such as heart palpitations and cardiac arrest.

Students’ access to prescription medications, believed to boost attention span and memory, can be even more dangerous.

Students can easily buy pills from classmates and friends who have a prescription for attention deficit disorder medication. According to the Medicine Abuse Project prepared by the Center on Young Adult Health and Development Center on Young Adult Health and Development at the University of Maryland School or Public Health, 31 percent of college students will use prescription stimulants like Adderall and Vyvanse for nonmedical reasons during their college years.

“This is a bad idea. It’s potentially very dangerous, not to mention illegal,” Ticola said.

“Students think it’s going to help them focus, and it might, but it can have some serious cardiovascular effects. People can have blood pressure problems, elevated heart rate, or even cardiac arrhythmia if someone has a bad heart.”

Even if a student has taken prescription medications before without incident, they could still be at risk for heart problems the next time. No one should take medications like Adderall and Vyvanse unless they have a prescription for it.

Finals week can be stressful, but there are better alternatives to get the most out of studying time without caffeine or pills.

“Eating a well-balanced diet, getting adequate sleep and exercising daily will help students manage and reduce the stress that comes with finals week. They will be able to study more efficiently and not need to guzzle coffee to stay awake,” Ticola said.

Finals Weeks Essentials

1. Healthy drinks and snacks
Have some tasty grub on hand for those long nights. Go for some veggies, fruit and nuts instead of processed foods or highly caffeinated drinks, because where there’s a high, there’s also a crash.

2. Sleep
You’ll do better on that big test if you spend more time sleeping and less time cramming. Students who sleep more have higher GPAs according to a study explained by Dr. Michael J. Breus.

3. Breaks
Take a break every so often to give your brain a rest and reduce stress and anxiety. Take a walk, talk to friends or just sit and give your brain a rest.

4. A study buddy
Having a study buddy can keep you focused and motivated throughout hours of relearning cumulative information.

5. Anti-distraction app
Computer applications like WasteNoTime and LeechBlock can block distracting websites and social media outlets to keep you on track to a better grade and a more attentive mind.

Opinion

#community

By MCDAVID MADDOX

If you have spoken with any student in a leadership position, the words “community” and “intentional” most likely found their way into your conversation. Over the past three years at Samford, these words began to develop a negative connotation in my mind and became trite to the point that when mentioned, I would internally roll my eyes. (If you doubt the excessive way these words are used, search #intentional or #community on Twitter.)

However, over the past three months I lived and breathed everything Samford as I met with multiple members of administration, faculty and staff. One truth hit me in the face over and over, again and again: there are like, “lit-e-rally” hundreds of people working year-round to ensure that we, Samford students, have the best possible year. Each one is incredibly passionate about their work. I am grateful, to say the least, to have had the opportunity as your student body president to better know the hands which continually wind the clock that is Samford. Surrounded by the Samford staff, I find myself humbled as I realize how recalcitrant I once was and discover how real our #community truly is.

As my distaste for this word began to melt over the summer months, my full-on adoration of community would come in the wake of great tragedy. I experienced a third-person view of the Samford community during the celebration of the life of Trevelyn Campbell, our divinely talented peer whose smile was infectious. Community is found sitting in the silent unity of a crowd of students, professors and administration collectively mourning the death of a peer. It is found in ad hoc, tear-ridden eulogies given by Trevelyn’s friends. It is found in holding a stranger as she weeps without any sense of awkwardness. In the midst of profound, even unbearable grief, the beauty to be found is in our need for each other, to be comforted, and to know we still come together for a common purpose—For God, For Learning, Forever. #community

Watch the Throne

By JACKSON HOGAN

Kanye West is probably right when he says that he is better than you. Not even a decade has passed since the release of his first album, but the Chi-town rapper-producer has broken, written, re-broken and re-written the rules of hip hop with each of his seven releases, reinventing himself at every turn.

However, you are probably more familiar with Kanye West as the self-aggrandizing, MTV award show crashing, wanna-marry-a-porn-star line spitting Kardashian hubby who names children after navigational directions and claims George Bush hates black people.

Both aspects of Kanye West’s career are of the highest level of cultural significance.

Kanye is the purest concentration of the artist-celebrity: an idol without a single degree of separation between person and art. This tearing of the veil has made him the first and greatest of what will be a long line of public puppeteers — the newest type of Machiavellian —the self-crowned Art Prince.

Examine the conversations that surround the Kimyes, the Brangelinas and the Mileys of the world. Each topic of discussion is generally not about their artistic contributions (which is often their supposed claim to fame); rather, it tends towards personal action, rumor and gossip.

“Did you hear what Lindsey Lohan did last night?” is a much more common statement than “Ms. Lohan’s prowess in Mean Girls redefined what a teen movie can be.” Celebrity-artists often cease to be primarily artists and are rather public displays of personality. They are more known by “private” action than professional accomplishment and are judged more by the relative scandal of a tweet than the content of their work.

Celebrity shatters the artist’s shackles that bind his or her relevancy to the art’s content, resulting in unrestrained artistic freedom. Once an Art Prince earns celebrity, the celebrity can create art without an eye towards public appeal, as their relevancy and their music are no longer mutually dependent. If genius is produced alone in the forest, does it make a sound? The struggle between appealing to the lowest common denominator and creating art is removed when celebrity is the basis of celebrity, not the celebrity’s art. The result is the coexistence of total artistic freedom and fame.

As a relic, celebrity transforms the Art Prince into art. By creating music irrevocably dependent on his gargantuan persona, while simultaneously broadcasting every detail of his existence, Kanye’s art is his music and the narrative of his life as he chooses to write it— whether in the studio, on Twitter, at the VMA awards or in his bedroom. The Art Prince (for better or for worse) is both producer and product, an endless parade, a 24/7 moving picture for the rabid wolf of the American Id to gorge itself upon without pause. The Art Prince becomes an idol at the cost of humanity.

Waves Crashing: The New Fight for Women’s Rights

By FRANKLIN LOWE

On June 8, the American Theatre Wing hosted the 68th annual Tony Awards. Throughout the show I noticed that women were a large topic of conversation; specifically, a call to acknowledge the women who have dedicated their lives to theatre as an art, a business and a mission for social good. Not only did many of the nominees for best play, musical and revival project the image of strong, hard-working women, but both male and female recipients used their few precious moments in the limelight to thank the women—past and present—who have made live theatre a success.

The most moving example of these statements was made by operatic soprano Audra McDonald after she won “Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play” for her role of Billie Holiday in “Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar & Grill”. A beaming but tearful McDonald told the audience, “I want to thank all the shoulders of the strong and brave and courageous women that I am standing on. I’m standing on Lena Horne’s shoulders, I’m standing on Maya Angelou‘s shoulders, I’m standing on Diane Carroll, Ruby Dee and most of all Billie Holiday.”

Perhaps Broadway has finally decided that women make for interesting entertainment, valuable role models and smart investments. However, the number of beauty product ads (Pantene, Dove, and Aerie), TV shows (“Parks and Recreation”) and documentaries (“Miss Representation” and “Girl Rising”) that have begun to preach similar messages of recognition and appreciation suggests that we might be witnessing something much bigger than just a smart media campaign.

For years, many social historians have accepted the theory of the three waves of feminism: suffrage at the turn of the 20th century, Women’s Rights after WW2 through the 70s, and Girl Power in the 80s and 90s. I believe that this summer’s media has shown us that a new, fourth wave of feminism might be crashing through American society.

From highlighting the efforts of women in the arts and politics to identifying the injustices of unequal pay in the workplace, this new wave is focused on the equal compensation for and proper recognition of the efforts that women are making in our society. This wave realizes that women are already leaders in education, business, ministry, the armed forces, the arts and every other single facet of life. It is reminding us that women are not doing great things “for women,” but are doing great things as people.

I wonder, however, if this new wave of feminism will ever come through Samford’s hallowed gates. As much as the faculty and administration might encourage us to embrace the diversity that makes academia fulfilling, we students have decided to stick with traditions that degrade or downplay the efforts of women. Everything – from the way we assume women in certain majors want an “MRS degree” to the way female professors and administers are frequently treated like a Women’s Auxiliary – points to this commitment to leftover gender roles. We hide behind safe words of Southern manners and watered-down morality, but all this does is admit that we are afraid to celebrate the equality and efforts of our female students, faculty and staff. But time is running out. These waves are crashing and it is time to decide – will you jump in or run for cover?

Two Pages

by ADAM QUINN – Opinion Editor

When I came on staff as the Crimson’s Opinion Editor this fall, I was met with one simple but pointed question: why should the Crimson keep its opinion section?

The Crimson is supposed to be a laboratory for JMC students to gain hands-on experience writing, photographing and editing Samford’s news, sports and features—but most opinion columnists (myself included) are not even JMC majors. Instead, we are English majors, political science majors, religion majors and musical theater majors who may not write as journalists ever again.

The Crimson is supposed to be a resource for keeping up with national news, campus events, Samford’s sports teams and useful information for students—but opinion articles discuss and debate ideas, not report on them. This issue alone includes articles about feminism, Starbucks and Kanye West.

The Crimson is supposed to represent the voice of the student body as a whole: our interests, concerns, successes and griefs—but the opinion section is often a place for dissenting views, seldom heard voices and conscientious criticism.

Within this framework of what the Crimson is, the opinion section is notable for what it is not. The opinion section is an anomaly, a misfit, an iconoclast and a rebel. At first glance, we simply do not belong to the mission, the goal or the image of the Crimson. If the newspaper is going to get in trouble, it will happen in the opinion section. If an article is going to cause controversy, it will happen in the opinion section. If someone is going to get mad, upset or even offended, it will happen in the opinion section.

Which is why I love it.

In this year’s opinion section you will see columnists debating different sides of the same topic printed side-by-side to explore all sides of an issue. You will read the opinions of random passerby’s as we ask them what they think about anything and everything. You will read profiles on the opinions of fellow Samford students who may never write an opinion article themselves but still have opinions that we want to hear. You will read the opinions of sixteen different columnists—more than the Crimson’s opinion section has ever had— who will all be clamoring for the chance to write about what they think is important in the world. Hopefully, through each of these new features, the opinion section will more accurately capture the breadth of experience of every diverse type of Samford student and make sure each view has a chance to be heard.

The opinion section is also an opportunity, an invitation, a public soapbox and a catalyst for change. If we are going to celebrate the value of Samford’s community in personal anecdote, it will happen in the opinion section. If we are going to resist narrow-mindedness and conformity, it will happen in the opinion section. If we are going to work together to make Samford everything it has the potential to be, part of that work will happen in the opinion section.

I believe in letting you—male and female, Greek and independent, introverts and extroverts, Samford lovers and Samford skeptics, seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshman—write about your thoughts, your views, your beliefs, your opinions, and, ultimately, your lives. The opinion section is a big risk based on a big idea: to use the opportunity to fill these two blank pages with the inner lives of the people we sit next to in class, stand in line with in the Caf and walk past on Ben Brown every day. I, for one, cannot wait to read what all of you will come up with.

Let’s earn these two pages.

Sports

“Kickin’ It For Cancer” an all-around victory

 

By SAM CHANDLER

DSC_1007On Friday evening, a crowd of 1,072 students, parents, and local fans packed the track at the Samford University Track and Soccer Stadium to support the women’s soccer team as they hosted the fourth annual “Kickin’ It For Kids With Cancer” event. Playing in front of a boisterous sea of green that erupted with chants of “Ruff ‘Em Up,” the Bulldogs (3-3-0) emerged victorious in multiple ways

On the field, the Bulldogs earned their first home victory of the season, defeating the Belmont Bruins 2-0. Throughout the first half of play, the Samford women dominated the game, outshooting the Bruins by a margin of 8-1. Although scoring opportunities abounded, it took the Dogs until the 36th minute to strike first. A pass into the box by sophomore business major Anna Allen set up a strike from senior finance and pre-dentistry double major Amanda Abbott. Abbott laced a shot from 10 yards out that deflected off the Bruins’ goalkeeper before bouncing into the back of the net.

The Samford women carried their strong play into the second half, quickly adding the final goal of the night in the 48th minute. On what became the play of the game, sophomore marketing major Jermaine Seoposenwe sailed a gliding shot from the right flank into the upper left corner of the net from an impressive distance of 30 yards.

“I’ll fess up, that was supposed to be a cross,” said Seoposenwe. “But we’ll take anything we get, as long as we get a win.”

Although the Bruins mustered multiple scoring opportunities late in the second half, freshman nursing major Anna Maddox refused to concede a goal. This tallied the first shutout of her young career.

“Anna is getting better and better every day,” coach Todd Yelton said. “We just ask her to give us a great effort, and keep us in the game, and I think she’s certainly done that. I think she’s really come a long way in a very short period of time.”

Off the field, the women’s soccer team achieved another equally important goal. They were successful in raising around $4,000 for the Austin Hatcher Foundation.

The Austin Hatcher Foundation, founded by Samford alum Amy Jo Osborn and her husband Jim, provides no-cost support services to pediatric cancer patients and their families.

Amy and Jim’s son, Austin Hatcher Osborn, passed away from pediatric cancer when he was just nine weeks old.

“He came into the world really quick and was here for a short period of time,” said assistant soccer coach Jay Yelton, a longtime family friend of the Osborn’s. “But you know, the efforts of Amy Jo and Jim to start the foundation has been lasting.”

The proceeds from the “Kickin’ It” event, which were raised through T-shirt sales, a silent auction, and open donations, will benefit the Hope and Cope Drumming Program, a diversionary therapy program at Children’s of Alabama in downtown Birmingham.

“We found that when cancer patients are doing something to distract them, that family is able to bond and spend some quality time that isn’t revolving around this treatment or that doctor,” junior journalism and mass communication major Emily Featherston said. She is the coordinator of the “Kickin’ It” event.

“What we’re trying to do is grow this event to be bigger and involve more of the Samford community and more of Homewood and the area community cause that’s really what our goal is,” Featherston said.

Volleyball goes 1-2 at Northern Kentucky University tournament

By SAMANTHA STALLINGS

This past weekend, the Samford volleyball team went 1-2 at the Northern Kentucky University Invitational in Highland Heights, Ky.

“It was a tough weekend, but we did learn a lot about how we approach matches,” head coach Derek Schroeder said. “We played very well late against EMU for that win. They were the most physical and strong team at the tournament. We need to do better against the less physical teams that are going to play us with a tough defense and a more aggressive offensive style more like a SoCon opponent.  We will get to work on that this week.”

It was a homecoming tournament for sophomore fitness and health promotion major Gabbi Greenwald and freshman psychology major Mikaela Milam, who are both from Louisville, Ky. This was also Milam’s first collegiate tournament after having to sit out last week due to an injury.

“It was cool playing so close to home,” said Greenwald, “and being able to see family and friends that I haven’t seen for a long time.”

Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 11.13.27 PMIn the first match of the tournament on Friday night, the Northern Kentucky Norse swept the Bulldogs. In the first set Samford and NKU rallied back and forth until the Norse started pulling away after the score was tied at seven for both sides. The Norse scored seven straight points until a kill by senior journalism mass communication major Michaela Reesor put the score at 14-8. The Norse scored the next two points and Samford went on a 3-0 run with two kills in the run by sophomore biochemistry major Kiahna Wicks and Reesor, putting the score at 19-14. However, the Bulldogs weren’t able to come back due to their 25-18 loss from the first set.

The second set was another battle between Samford and NKU, but the Bulldogs lost 25-23. Reesor had 17 kills for the whole night, senior sports administration major Chelsi Carter had 11 digs and two service aces, while sophomore pre-business major Erika Pifer had 44 assists.

Samford defeated the Eastern Michigan University Eagles 3-2 in the second match of the tournament on Saturday morning. The Eagles went on a 4-0 early run, but the Bulldogs rallied back with a kill by Reesor to tie the first set 17-17. Samford and EMU battled back and forth until the Eagles took control and won the first set 25-21.

The Bulldogs won the second set 25-23. Samford and EMU split the third and fourth sets. In the fifth set, the Bulldogs had the momentum and won 15-12. Reesor ended this match with 25 kills, Greenwald with a career high of 14 kills, Carter with five service aces and 24 digs and Pifer with 55 assists.

In the final match of the weekend the Bulldogs lost to the Southern Illinois-Edwardsville Cougars 3-1.The Bulldogs lost the first set 25-17 .The Bulldogs battled back and won the second set 25-23, but that wasn’t enough for the Bulldogs as they lost the last two sets. Reesor had 18 kills and two block assists. While Greenwald had 11 kills, and Wicks had four block assists. Reesor also made all-tournament team.

“This weekend was a rollercoaster of ups and downs in all areas of our play,” said Reesor. “ This coming week we have to focus on our defense and holding ourselves to a higher standard on the court.”

Next, Samford will travel to Tallahassee, Fla., for the Seminole Classic hosted by Florida State on Friday, Sep 12, at 10 a.m. against the University of Central Arkansas. The Bulldogs will also play Florida State and Louisiana State University in the tournament.

Samford Football Gears Up for Home Opener

By JOHNNY RICHARDS

The Samford football team is finishing preparations for the season’s home opener against Stillman College.

Anchored by transfer redshirt junior communication studies major and quarterback Michael Eubank, the Bulldogs look to continue the goal of repeating as Southern Conference champions. Redshirt sophomore undecided major running back Denzel Williams and redshirt senior psychology major free safety Jaquiski Tartt will also play a major role.

“We have been getting after it and the coaches have been doing a good job,” said senior defensive lineman and finance major Brinson Porter. “This week has been a little different with the game on Thursday, but usually that change in the atmosphere is exciting and new and everyone is on their toes because of it.”

Screen Shot 2014-09-09 at 11.06.50 PMThe Stillman Tigers are 0-1 on the young season, but they are certainly capable of quick strike touchdowns as well as wearing down the defense on a long drive. One player to watch for Stillman will be senior running back Jovontae Thurman. He ran for a 66-yard touchdown in their previous game and could pose a quick strike threat again.

Kickoff is set to begin at 6:30 p.m. in Seibert Stadium. The game is Military Appreciation Night and all military and first responders will receive free admission to the game.

Softball wins final regular season series

CHRIS GRIESEDIECK – Sports Writer 

The Samford softball team hosted the Georgia Southern Eagles this past weekend in the final regular season SoCon matchup.

The Dogs won the first two games of the series before losing on Sunday. Samford edged GSU 1-0 and 2-1 in Saturday’s doubleheader.

Sophomore nursing major Caroline Wilder blasted a solo home run in game one and recorded the game-winning hit late in the second game to clinch the series for the Bulldogs.

Game three had more offense from both teams, but the Eagles took the game by a score of 7-4.

“We really fought hard the entire weekend,” senior education major Arica Dykes said. “If we struck out in previous at bats we were determined to make something happen the next at bat.”

Dykes was recognized before Sunday’s game for her achievements and dedication to the team as the only senior on the roster.

Dykes scored the first run of the senior day contest after getting hit by a pitch.

In the fourth inning junior graphic design major Rachel Bickert touched home on a base hit by Dykes.

Freshman exercise science major Abbie Miranda went 2-for-3 with an RBI and a run scored to lead the offense on Sunday.

The Bulldogs (36-16, 11-9 SoCon) will begin the 2014 SoCon championship tournament today as the number four seed.

The Bulldogs will face fifth-seeded UNCG at 4:30 p.m. (CDT).

“We are all really excited to get there,” Dykes said. “We have had a good season and coming off a great weekend, but we still have a lot to prove.”